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Best Dogs for Men - Men s Health


To see a man about a dog or horse is an English idiom , usually used as a way to say one needs to apologise for one's imminent departure or absence—generally to euphemistically conceal one's true purpose, such as going to use the toilet or going to buy a drink.

The earliest confirmed publication is the 1866 Dion Boucicault play Flying Scud [2] in which a character knowingly breezes past a difficult situation saying, "Excuse me Mr. Quail, I can't stop; I've got to see a man about a dog." [3] [4] In a listing for a 1939 revival on the NBC Radio program America's Lost Plays , Time magazine observed that the phrase was the play's "claim to fame". [5]

During Prohibition in the United States , the phrase was most commonly used in relation to the consumption or purchase of alcoholic beverages. [4]

To see a man about a dog or horse is an English idiom , usually used as a way to say one needs to apologise for one's imminent departure or absence—generally to euphemistically conceal one's true purpose, such as going to use the toilet or going to buy a drink.

The earliest confirmed publication is the 1866 Dion Boucicault play Flying Scud [2] in which a character knowingly breezes past a difficult situation saying, "Excuse me Mr. Quail, I can't stop; I've got to see a man about a dog." [3] [4] In a listing for a 1939 revival on the NBC Radio program America's Lost Plays , Time magazine observed that the phrase was the play's "claim to fame". [5]

During Prohibition in the United States , the phrase was most commonly used in relation to the consumption or purchase of alcoholic beverages. [4]

(Definition of “see a man about a dog” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

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To see a man about a dog or horse is an English idiom , usually used as a way to say one needs to apologise for one's imminent departure or absence—generally to euphemistically conceal one's true purpose, such as going to use the toilet or going to buy a drink.

The earliest confirmed publication is the 1866 Dion Boucicault play Flying Scud [2] in which a character knowingly breezes past a difficult situation saying, "Excuse me Mr. Quail, I can't stop; I've got to see a man about a dog." [3] [4] In a listing for a 1939 revival on the NBC Radio program America's Lost Plays , Time magazine observed that the phrase was the play's "claim to fame". [5]

During Prohibition in the United States , the phrase was most commonly used in relation to the consumption or purchase of alcoholic beverages. [4]

(Definition of “see a man about a dog” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

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