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Welcome to 20 No-Sugar Days Diet | Days To Fitness


Sugar free cooking expert Carolyn Hartz revealed her weight loss secrets on  This Morning  today, speaking to presenters Eamonn Holmes and Ruth Langsford.

She has recently released a baking book, Sugar Free Baking, to help others imitate the cooking style that has kept her so well preserved.

She said: “I do believe you don't go without - once you say you're not going to have cake, you want it more. I call it my deprivation centre. 

“You have to eat breakfast, I started to have protein every meal, I started to have eggs and salmon and protein in the mornings because protein is sustaining.”

Sugar free cooking expert Carolyn Hartz revealed her weight loss secrets on  This Morning  today, speaking to presenters Eamonn Holmes and Ruth Langsford.

She has recently released a baking book, Sugar Free Baking, to help others imitate the cooking style that has kept her so well preserved.

She said: “I do believe you don't go without - once you say you're not going to have cake, you want it more. I call it my deprivation centre. 

“You have to eat breakfast, I started to have protein every meal, I started to have eggs and salmon and protein in the mornings because protein is sustaining.”

A s a mother of four I am not sure how I am supposed to feel about sugar. If I believe the anti-sugar lobby, it's "the new tobacco". Sugar rather than fat, the argument goes, is responsible for ever-rising levels of obesity. "Sugar is not addictive like tobacco," explains Professor Graham MacGregor, chairman of the campaign group Action on Sugar , "but it causes just as much harm in other ways. It is an unnecessary source of calories and a major cause of obesity, thereby causing many deaths and diabetes."

The more sugar you eat or drink, the more the body stores it as fat. Hence the links to obesity. But what is emerging is just how much of what we eat is stuffed with "hidden" sugar, not just in fizzy drinks and doughnuts, but sauces, cereals, fruit juices, even fruit itself. This month Britain's chief medical officer Dame Sally Davies said " we may need to introduce a sugar tax" to help reduce the amount manufacturers put in their products.

This can be confusing for the average person who is just trying to feed their kids. And that's before addressing the counter-argument that sugar is taking too much of the blame and that overall nutrition, as well as exercise, are important too.

To try to make sense of it all, I go cold turkey for 30 days, dragging my family along for the ride. If I cut out sugar, would I feel better? Being the kind of person who steams my children's vegetables while allowing them a sticky bun at the weekend, I am a pretty good guinea pig. How much hidden sugar is really in my children's diet? And how much of life without sugar can I tolerate?

I've done a lot of reading: Michael Moss's bestseller Salt Sugar Fa t; the blog Kate Quit Sugar ; the NHS Choices website; endless press coverage; James Duigan's Clean & Lean Diet . I've watched Dr Robert Lustig's convincing lecture, Sugar: the Bitter Truth , on YouTube.

Here's what goes in the bin: Cheerios, Fruit and Fibre, Petits Filous yoghurts (my son has been known to eat three on the trot), baked beans, tomato sauce, tomato and mascarpone pasta sauce and the children's Saturday evening "treat": pizzas. Also on the way out are jam, honey and anything, frankly, that kids find tastes nice.

We’ve pulled together our most popular recipes, our latest additions and our editor’s picks, so there’s sure to be something tempting for you to try.

If you've ever been tempted to cut back on sugar but can't face going cold turkey, Davina's realistic approach will have you shunning the sweet stuff in no time...

Over the last year, sugar's effect on our health has been well documented in a constant stream of damning research. The sweet stuff is now food enemy number one and is to blame for far more than hyperactive children and tooth decay.

With the World Health Organisation rewriting its recommendations for daily intake, you’ve possibly considered cutting back - but how do you kick the habit? Television presenter and fitness guru, Davina McCall is keen to get the nation talking about sugar and here she shares her realistic tips and personal journey to becoming sugar-free…


As of today, how long have you been sugar-free?
This time I’ve been sugar-free for five months. I had given up sugar for a couple of years previously, but then when I did my Sport Relief challenge I started eating it again. I was doing an awful lot of exercise and had to eat a lot of sugar in the form of liquid gels and carbohydrates - such as rice and pasta - to keep my energy up. Really, carbs don’t need to take up more than 10-20% of a meal, but my meals were about 70% carbs during that time! 
 

What was it that made you decide to give up sugar?
When my sister got cancer, the nutritionist told me that she should give up sugar and I found that quite telling. I did some research and realised I was a slave to it.  We need a certain amount of carbohydrates but we don’t need added sugar. Stop eating it and you stop mood swings, bad skin and weight gain.
 

Sugar and flour give your body quick energy. If this energy is not used immediately, it becomes stored as fat. If you cut down on sugar and flour, you are more likely to lose weight. If you are very diligent about reducing your sugar intake, you will lose weight faster. In addition, the more you eat sugar, the more you crave it. By not allowing sugar into your diet, the cravings will stop and you will have more energy.

Breakfast can be an omelet muffin. For lunch, try a Greek salad. No-sugar-added yogurt can be your afternoon snack. Dinner might be chicken breasts in a mustard rosemary sauce with a spinach salad with a vinaigrette dressing and a helping of steamed brown rice.

Another day's menu could be a breakfast of whole grain cereal, no sugar added, with nonfat milk. For lunch enjoy tuna that is water-packed, on a bed of greens with shredded carrots and sliced tomatoes and a sugar-free vinaigrette. Your afternoon snack can be spiced edamame (soybeans). Try meatballs with sugar-free tomato sauce with baked polenta and a side of fresh corn for dinner.

For a third day's menu, try a crepe with lean ham and reduced fat cheese. For your morning snack, take a stalk of celery with a natural peanut butter that has no sugar added. Try a taco salad with prawns for lunch. Your afternoon snack can be an unsweetened rice cake with unsweetened jelly. Curry chicken with steamed zucchini and steamed rice fills out the dinner menu.

If you exercise on a regular basis, your endorphins will kick in, giving you natural high and feeling of well-being. So take a walk instead of reaching for something sweet. If you are a grazer, eat smaller meals that are more frequent during the day. Drink plenty of water. Drinking a glass of water hydrates your body while telling your stomach it is full and doesn't need a sugary snack.

Sugar free cooking expert Carolyn Hartz revealed her weight loss secrets on  This Morning  today, speaking to presenters Eamonn Holmes and Ruth Langsford.

She has recently released a baking book, Sugar Free Baking, to help others imitate the cooking style that has kept her so well preserved.

She said: “I do believe you don't go without - once you say you're not going to have cake, you want it more. I call it my deprivation centre. 

“You have to eat breakfast, I started to have protein every meal, I started to have eggs and salmon and protein in the mornings because protein is sustaining.”

A s a mother of four I am not sure how I am supposed to feel about sugar. If I believe the anti-sugar lobby, it's "the new tobacco". Sugar rather than fat, the argument goes, is responsible for ever-rising levels of obesity. "Sugar is not addictive like tobacco," explains Professor Graham MacGregor, chairman of the campaign group Action on Sugar , "but it causes just as much harm in other ways. It is an unnecessary source of calories and a major cause of obesity, thereby causing many deaths and diabetes."

The more sugar you eat or drink, the more the body stores it as fat. Hence the links to obesity. But what is emerging is just how much of what we eat is stuffed with "hidden" sugar, not just in fizzy drinks and doughnuts, but sauces, cereals, fruit juices, even fruit itself. This month Britain's chief medical officer Dame Sally Davies said " we may need to introduce a sugar tax" to help reduce the amount manufacturers put in their products.

This can be confusing for the average person who is just trying to feed their kids. And that's before addressing the counter-argument that sugar is taking too much of the blame and that overall nutrition, as well as exercise, are important too.

To try to make sense of it all, I go cold turkey for 30 days, dragging my family along for the ride. If I cut out sugar, would I feel better? Being the kind of person who steams my children's vegetables while allowing them a sticky bun at the weekend, I am a pretty good guinea pig. How much hidden sugar is really in my children's diet? And how much of life without sugar can I tolerate?

I've done a lot of reading: Michael Moss's bestseller Salt Sugar Fa t; the blog Kate Quit Sugar ; the NHS Choices website; endless press coverage; James Duigan's Clean & Lean Diet . I've watched Dr Robert Lustig's convincing lecture, Sugar: the Bitter Truth , on YouTube.

Here's what goes in the bin: Cheerios, Fruit and Fibre, Petits Filous yoghurts (my son has been known to eat three on the trot), baked beans, tomato sauce, tomato and mascarpone pasta sauce and the children's Saturday evening "treat": pizzas. Also on the way out are jam, honey and anything, frankly, that kids find tastes nice.

Sugar free cooking expert Carolyn Hartz revealed her weight loss secrets on  This Morning  today, speaking to presenters Eamonn Holmes and Ruth Langsford.

She has recently released a baking book, Sugar Free Baking, to help others imitate the cooking style that has kept her so well preserved.

She said: “I do believe you don't go without - once you say you're not going to have cake, you want it more. I call it my deprivation centre. 

“You have to eat breakfast, I started to have protein every meal, I started to have eggs and salmon and protein in the mornings because protein is sustaining.”

A s a mother of four I am not sure how I am supposed to feel about sugar. If I believe the anti-sugar lobby, it's "the new tobacco". Sugar rather than fat, the argument goes, is responsible for ever-rising levels of obesity. "Sugar is not addictive like tobacco," explains Professor Graham MacGregor, chairman of the campaign group Action on Sugar , "but it causes just as much harm in other ways. It is an unnecessary source of calories and a major cause of obesity, thereby causing many deaths and diabetes."

The more sugar you eat or drink, the more the body stores it as fat. Hence the links to obesity. But what is emerging is just how much of what we eat is stuffed with "hidden" sugar, not just in fizzy drinks and doughnuts, but sauces, cereals, fruit juices, even fruit itself. This month Britain's chief medical officer Dame Sally Davies said " we may need to introduce a sugar tax" to help reduce the amount manufacturers put in their products.

This can be confusing for the average person who is just trying to feed their kids. And that's before addressing the counter-argument that sugar is taking too much of the blame and that overall nutrition, as well as exercise, are important too.

To try to make sense of it all, I go cold turkey for 30 days, dragging my family along for the ride. If I cut out sugar, would I feel better? Being the kind of person who steams my children's vegetables while allowing them a sticky bun at the weekend, I am a pretty good guinea pig. How much hidden sugar is really in my children's diet? And how much of life without sugar can I tolerate?

I've done a lot of reading: Michael Moss's bestseller Salt Sugar Fa t; the blog Kate Quit Sugar ; the NHS Choices website; endless press coverage; James Duigan's Clean & Lean Diet . I've watched Dr Robert Lustig's convincing lecture, Sugar: the Bitter Truth , on YouTube.

Here's what goes in the bin: Cheerios, Fruit and Fibre, Petits Filous yoghurts (my son has been known to eat three on the trot), baked beans, tomato sauce, tomato and mascarpone pasta sauce and the children's Saturday evening "treat": pizzas. Also on the way out are jam, honey and anything, frankly, that kids find tastes nice.

We’ve pulled together our most popular recipes, our latest additions and our editor’s picks, so there’s sure to be something tempting for you to try.

If you've ever been tempted to cut back on sugar but can't face going cold turkey, Davina's realistic approach will have you shunning the sweet stuff in no time...

Over the last year, sugar's effect on our health has been well documented in a constant stream of damning research. The sweet stuff is now food enemy number one and is to blame for far more than hyperactive children and tooth decay.

With the World Health Organisation rewriting its recommendations for daily intake, you’ve possibly considered cutting back - but how do you kick the habit? Television presenter and fitness guru, Davina McCall is keen to get the nation talking about sugar and here she shares her realistic tips and personal journey to becoming sugar-free…


As of today, how long have you been sugar-free?
This time I’ve been sugar-free for five months. I had given up sugar for a couple of years previously, but then when I did my Sport Relief challenge I started eating it again. I was doing an awful lot of exercise and had to eat a lot of sugar in the form of liquid gels and carbohydrates - such as rice and pasta - to keep my energy up. Really, carbs don’t need to take up more than 10-20% of a meal, but my meals were about 70% carbs during that time! 
 

What was it that made you decide to give up sugar?
When my sister got cancer, the nutritionist told me that she should give up sugar and I found that quite telling. I did some research and realised I was a slave to it.  We need a certain amount of carbohydrates but we don’t need added sugar. Stop eating it and you stop mood swings, bad skin and weight gain.
 


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