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The Incal 2 (Issue) - comicvine.gamespot.com


The Incal is a science fiction comic book series written in French by Chilean writer Alejandro Jodorowsky and illustrated by Moebius and others. The Incal introduced Jodorowsky's "Jodoverse", a fictional universe in which his science fiction comics take place.

The story begins in the dystopian capital city of an insignificant planet in a human -dominated galactic empire , wherein the Bergs, aliens who resemble featherless birds and reside in a neighboring galaxy , make up another power bloc. DiFool receives the Light Incal, a crystal of enormous powers, from a dying Berg. The Incal is then sought by many factions: the Bergs; the corrupt government of the great pit-city; the rebel group Amok; and the Church of Industrial Saints (commonly referred to as the Techno-Technos or the Technopriests ): a sinister technocratic cult which worships the Dark Incal. Animah (an allusion to anima ), the keeper of the Light Incal, seeks it as well.

The series mixes space opera , metaphysics, and satire; a counterpoint to the grandiosity of the events is always DiFool's base, even cowardly nature. Every major character in The Incal is based upon Tarot cards – for example, John DiFool is based upon The Fool with his name being a pun upon "John, the Fool". (A small friendly companion, like Deepo in The Incal , accompanies the Fool on his journey.) Animah's name is based on the Jungian concept of the anima , the feminine part of every male's psyche.

The Incal was the first comic set in what became the Jodoverse or Metabarons Universe. The ones translated into English are John DiFool avant l'Incal , a prequel to The Incal with artwork by Zoran Janjetov ; La Caste des Méta-Barons , with artwork by Juan Giménez , which relates the history of a dynasty of perfect warriors prior to The Incal , leading up to the Metabaron from the Incal stories; Technopriests , with artwork by Zoran Janjetov; and Megalex .

Moebius and Jodorowsky sued Luc Besson , director of The Fifth Element , claiming that the film borrowed graphic and story elements from The Incal , but they lost their case. [1] In a 2002 interview with Danish comic book magazine Strip! , Jodorowsky actually claimed that he considered it an honour that somebody stole his ideas. Jodorowsky believes that authors do not create the stories they tell as much as they make personal interpretations of mythemes shared by the collective unconscious .

In a interview given to Chilean newspaper The Clinic , Jodorowsky claimed that neither him nor Moebius actually sued Besson, but that the editor of the comic book was the one who did so. He further claimed that he lost the case because Moebius "betrayed them" by working directly with Besson on the production of the film. [2]

Originally published in installments between 1980 and 1988 in the French magazine Métal Hurlant , and followed by Before the Incal (1988–1995, with Zoran Janjetov ), After the Incal (2000, with Jean Giraud), and Final Incal (2008–2014, with José Ladrönn ) [9] [10] has been described as a contender for "the best comic book" in the medium's history. [11] From it came spin-off series Metabarons , The Technopriests , and Mégalex .

The center of the concept is DiFool's fantastic spiritual journey (or initiation [12] ) on a cosmic scale, which he is reluctant to accept; he constantly wishes to return to his own ignorant reality of simple hedonistic pleasures. It is an allegory for the sins repeating , the futility of complacency and the necessity for individual transformation. [3] As the story progresses he keeps changing, becoming more heroic, even physically more handsome. [10] [18] [19] The original six installments begin and end by DiFool falling from the bridge; he descends, ascends and later re-descends in "closed" circularity. [20] [12]

The universe is split into two galaxies, a human (with 22,000 planets), and a Berg (featherless birdlike aliens), and the story is set on four planets in the human galaxy: Ter21, Techno-Gea, Aquaend, and the Golden Planet. [1]

The Final Incal is kind of a call for revolt to organize life in a different way, because as individuals people are mortal, but as humanity itself they are immortal. To learn that others exist, to live together and give, that there is continuity only as part of humanity as a whole. [10] It demonstrates that "love is the ultimate purifier; a force that can cleanse, renew and revitalize". [16]

The series capture worlds with cityscapes, huge spacecrafts and lands populated by technopriests, rubbish-dwelling mutants, doppelgängers, giant jellyfish, chiming forests of gems and jostling, old gurus floating on crystals, an underground rat army, flying leeches, "necro-panzers", a selfish humanity among others. [25] [23] [26] Some touches are borrowed directly from Dune : the Emperoress, a "perfect androgyne", or Aquend, a planet composed entirely of water which is Arrakis's seeming opposite, and a "mentrek" who betrayed his former master. [7]

Jean Giraud 's (also known as Moebius) artwork and Yves Chaland 's colouring from The Incal were well praised. Jodorowsky initially didn't have a script, but recounted and mimed the ideas to Moebius who sketched the scenario, recorded their conversation on tape, and they jointly altered the plot. [5] Jon Evans considered resemblance to the De Stijl school of art inspired by artists like Piet Mondrian and Vilmos Huszár . [4]

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The Incal is a science fiction comic book series written in French by Chilean writer Alejandro Jodorowsky and illustrated by Moebius and others. The Incal introduced Jodorowsky's "Jodoverse", a fictional universe in which his science fiction comics take place.

The story begins in the dystopian capital city of an insignificant planet in a human -dominated galactic empire , wherein the Bergs, aliens who resemble featherless birds and reside in a neighboring galaxy , make up another power bloc. DiFool receives the Light Incal, a crystal of enormous powers, from a dying Berg. The Incal is then sought by many factions: the Bergs; the corrupt government of the great pit-city; the rebel group Amok; and the Church of Industrial Saints (commonly referred to as the Techno-Technos or the Technopriests ): a sinister technocratic cult which worships the Dark Incal. Animah (an allusion to anima ), the keeper of the Light Incal, seeks it as well.

The series mixes space opera , metaphysics, and satire; a counterpoint to the grandiosity of the events is always DiFool's base, even cowardly nature. Every major character in The Incal is based upon Tarot cards – for example, John DiFool is based upon The Fool with his name being a pun upon "John, the Fool". (A small friendly companion, like Deepo in The Incal , accompanies the Fool on his journey.) Animah's name is based on the Jungian concept of the anima , the feminine part of every male's psyche.

The Incal was the first comic set in what became the Jodoverse or Metabarons Universe. The ones translated into English are John DiFool avant l'Incal , a prequel to The Incal with artwork by Zoran Janjetov ; La Caste des Méta-Barons , with artwork by Juan Giménez , which relates the history of a dynasty of perfect warriors prior to The Incal , leading up to the Metabaron from the Incal stories; Technopriests , with artwork by Zoran Janjetov; and Megalex .

Moebius and Jodorowsky sued Luc Besson , director of The Fifth Element , claiming that the film borrowed graphic and story elements from The Incal , but they lost their case. [1] In a 2002 interview with Danish comic book magazine Strip! , Jodorowsky actually claimed that he considered it an honour that somebody stole his ideas. Jodorowsky believes that authors do not create the stories they tell as much as they make personal interpretations of mythemes shared by the collective unconscious .

In a interview given to Chilean newspaper The Clinic , Jodorowsky claimed that neither him nor Moebius actually sued Besson, but that the editor of the comic book was the one who did so. He further claimed that he lost the case because Moebius "betrayed them" by working directly with Besson on the production of the film. [2]

The Incal is a science fiction comic book series written in French by Chilean writer Alejandro Jodorowsky and illustrated by Moebius and others. The Incal introduced Jodorowsky's "Jodoverse", a fictional universe in which his science fiction comics take place.

The story begins in the dystopian capital city of an insignificant planet in a human -dominated galactic empire , wherein the Bergs, aliens who resemble featherless birds and reside in a neighboring galaxy , make up another power bloc. DiFool receives the Light Incal, a crystal of enormous powers, from a dying Berg. The Incal is then sought by many factions: the Bergs; the corrupt government of the great pit-city; the rebel group Amok; and the Church of Industrial Saints (commonly referred to as the Techno-Technos or the Technopriests ): a sinister technocratic cult which worships the Dark Incal. Animah (an allusion to anima ), the keeper of the Light Incal, seeks it as well.

The series mixes space opera , metaphysics, and satire; a counterpoint to the grandiosity of the events is always DiFool's base, even cowardly nature. Every major character in The Incal is based upon Tarot cards – for example, John DiFool is based upon The Fool with his name being a pun upon "John, the Fool". (A small friendly companion, like Deepo in The Incal , accompanies the Fool on his journey.) Animah's name is based on the Jungian concept of the anima , the feminine part of every male's psyche.

The Incal was the first comic set in what became the Jodoverse or Metabarons Universe. The ones translated into English are John DiFool avant l'Incal , a prequel to The Incal with artwork by Zoran Janjetov ; La Caste des Méta-Barons , with artwork by Juan Giménez , which relates the history of a dynasty of perfect warriors prior to The Incal , leading up to the Metabaron from the Incal stories; Technopriests , with artwork by Zoran Janjetov; and Megalex .

Moebius and Jodorowsky sued Luc Besson , director of The Fifth Element , claiming that the film borrowed graphic and story elements from The Incal , but they lost their case. [1] In a 2002 interview with Danish comic book magazine Strip! , Jodorowsky actually claimed that he considered it an honour that somebody stole his ideas. Jodorowsky believes that authors do not create the stories they tell as much as they make personal interpretations of mythemes shared by the collective unconscious .

In a interview given to Chilean newspaper The Clinic , Jodorowsky claimed that neither him nor Moebius actually sued Besson, but that the editor of the comic book was the one who did so. He further claimed that he lost the case because Moebius "betrayed them" by working directly with Besson on the production of the film. [2]

Originally published in installments between 1980 and 1988 in the French magazine Métal Hurlant , and followed by Before the Incal (1988–1995, with Zoran Janjetov ), After the Incal (2000, with Jean Giraud), and Final Incal (2008–2014, with José Ladrönn ) [9] [10] has been described as a contender for "the best comic book" in the medium's history. [11] From it came spin-off series Metabarons , The Technopriests , and Mégalex .

The center of the concept is DiFool's fantastic spiritual journey (or initiation [12] ) on a cosmic scale, which he is reluctant to accept; he constantly wishes to return to his own ignorant reality of simple hedonistic pleasures. It is an allegory for the sins repeating , the futility of complacency and the necessity for individual transformation. [3] As the story progresses he keeps changing, becoming more heroic, even physically more handsome. [10] [18] [19] The original six installments begin and end by DiFool falling from the bridge; he descends, ascends and later re-descends in "closed" circularity. [20] [12]

The universe is split into two galaxies, a human (with 22,000 planets), and a Berg (featherless birdlike aliens), and the story is set on four planets in the human galaxy: Ter21, Techno-Gea, Aquaend, and the Golden Planet. [1]

The Final Incal is kind of a call for revolt to organize life in a different way, because as individuals people are mortal, but as humanity itself they are immortal. To learn that others exist, to live together and give, that there is continuity only as part of humanity as a whole. [10] It demonstrates that "love is the ultimate purifier; a force that can cleanse, renew and revitalize". [16]

The series capture worlds with cityscapes, huge spacecrafts and lands populated by technopriests, rubbish-dwelling mutants, doppelgängers, giant jellyfish, chiming forests of gems and jostling, old gurus floating on crystals, an underground rat army, flying leeches, "necro-panzers", a selfish humanity among others. [25] [23] [26] Some touches are borrowed directly from Dune : the Emperoress, a "perfect androgyne", or Aquend, a planet composed entirely of water which is Arrakis's seeming opposite, and a "mentrek" who betrayed his former master. [7]

Jean Giraud 's (also known as Moebius) artwork and Yves Chaland 's colouring from The Incal were well praised. Jodorowsky initially didn't have a script, but recounted and mimed the ideas to Moebius who sketched the scenario, recorded their conversation on tape, and they jointly altered the plot. [5] Jon Evans considered resemblance to the De Stijl school of art inspired by artists like Piet Mondrian and Vilmos Huszár . [4]

The Incal is a science fiction comic book series written in French by Chilean writer Alejandro Jodorowsky and illustrated by Moebius and others. The Incal introduced Jodorowsky's "Jodoverse", a fictional universe in which his science fiction comics take place.

The story begins in the dystopian capital city of an insignificant planet in a human -dominated galactic empire , wherein the Bergs, aliens who resemble featherless birds and reside in a neighboring galaxy , make up another power bloc. DiFool receives the Light Incal, a crystal of enormous powers, from a dying Berg. The Incal is then sought by many factions: the Bergs; the corrupt government of the great pit-city; the rebel group Amok; and the Church of Industrial Saints (commonly referred to as the Techno-Technos or the Technopriests ): a sinister technocratic cult which worships the Dark Incal. Animah (an allusion to anima ), the keeper of the Light Incal, seeks it as well.

The series mixes space opera , metaphysics, and satire; a counterpoint to the grandiosity of the events is always DiFool's base, even cowardly nature. Every major character in The Incal is based upon Tarot cards – for example, John DiFool is based upon The Fool with his name being a pun upon "John, the Fool". (A small friendly companion, like Deepo in The Incal , accompanies the Fool on his journey.) Animah's name is based on the Jungian concept of the anima , the feminine part of every male's psyche.

The Incal was the first comic set in what became the Jodoverse or Metabarons Universe. The ones translated into English are John DiFool avant l'Incal , a prequel to The Incal with artwork by Zoran Janjetov ; La Caste des Méta-Barons , with artwork by Juan Giménez , which relates the history of a dynasty of perfect warriors prior to The Incal , leading up to the Metabaron from the Incal stories; Technopriests , with artwork by Zoran Janjetov; and Megalex .

Moebius and Jodorowsky sued Luc Besson , director of The Fifth Element , claiming that the film borrowed graphic and story elements from The Incal , but they lost their case. [1] In a 2002 interview with Danish comic book magazine Strip! , Jodorowsky actually claimed that he considered it an honour that somebody stole his ideas. Jodorowsky believes that authors do not create the stories they tell as much as they make personal interpretations of mythemes shared by the collective unconscious .

In a interview given to Chilean newspaper The Clinic , Jodorowsky claimed that neither him nor Moebius actually sued Besson, but that the editor of the comic book was the one who did so. He further claimed that he lost the case because Moebius "betrayed them" by working directly with Besson on the production of the film. [2]

Originally published in installments between 1980 and 1988 in the French magazine Métal Hurlant , and followed by Before the Incal (1988–1995, with Zoran Janjetov ), After the Incal (2000, with Jean Giraud), and Final Incal (2008–2014, with José Ladrönn ) [9] [10] has been described as a contender for "the best comic book" in the medium's history. [11] From it came spin-off series Metabarons , The Technopriests , and Mégalex .

The center of the concept is DiFool's fantastic spiritual journey (or initiation [12] ) on a cosmic scale, which he is reluctant to accept; he constantly wishes to return to his own ignorant reality of simple hedonistic pleasures. It is an allegory for the sins repeating , the futility of complacency and the necessity for individual transformation. [3] As the story progresses he keeps changing, becoming more heroic, even physically more handsome. [10] [18] [19] The original six installments begin and end by DiFool falling from the bridge; he descends, ascends and later re-descends in "closed" circularity. [20] [12]

The universe is split into two galaxies, a human (with 22,000 planets), and a Berg (featherless birdlike aliens), and the story is set on four planets in the human galaxy: Ter21, Techno-Gea, Aquaend, and the Golden Planet. [1]

The Final Incal is kind of a call for revolt to organize life in a different way, because as individuals people are mortal, but as humanity itself they are immortal. To learn that others exist, to live together and give, that there is continuity only as part of humanity as a whole. [10] It demonstrates that "love is the ultimate purifier; a force that can cleanse, renew and revitalize". [16]

The series capture worlds with cityscapes, huge spacecrafts and lands populated by technopriests, rubbish-dwelling mutants, doppelgängers, giant jellyfish, chiming forests of gems and jostling, old gurus floating on crystals, an underground rat army, flying leeches, "necro-panzers", a selfish humanity among others. [25] [23] [26] Some touches are borrowed directly from Dune : the Emperoress, a "perfect androgyne", or Aquend, a planet composed entirely of water which is Arrakis's seeming opposite, and a "mentrek" who betrayed his former master. [7]

Jean Giraud 's (also known as Moebius) artwork and Yves Chaland 's colouring from The Incal were well praised. Jodorowsky initially didn't have a script, but recounted and mimed the ideas to Moebius who sketched the scenario, recorded their conversation on tape, and they jointly altered the plot. [5] Jon Evans considered resemblance to the De Stijl school of art inspired by artists like Piet Mondrian and Vilmos Huszár . [4]

Until you earn 1000 points all your submissions need to be vetted by other Comic Vine users. This process takes no more than a few hours and we'll send you an email once approved.

Because you're new to wiki editing, we sent your submission off to our moderators to check it over. Most changes are approved within a few hours. We'll send an email when it is.

Once you've earned over points you'll be able to bypass this step and make live edits to our system. Until then, gain points by continuing to edit pages.

Thanks for continuing to improve the site. Some of your changes are now live. However, some of your changes were sent to moderation because you do not have enough points to make those live edits. You need points to live edit the changes you commited.

Thanks for continuing to improve the site. Your changes are now live. Our robot math gave you points for this submission.

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