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Cane - Wikipedia


1 The hollow jointed stem of a tall grass, especially bamboo or sugar cane, or the stem of a slender palm such as rattan.

2 A length of cane or a slender stick, especially one used as a support for plants, a walking stick, or an instrument of punishment.

Do you have a function or a wedding to plan? Naturally Cane offers a select range of furniture available to you for hire. Enquire direct for pricing and further details.

Borrowing from Old French cane ( “ sugar cane ” ) , from Latin canna ( “ reed ” ) , from Ancient Greek κάννα ( kánna ) , from Akkadian 𒄀 ( qanû , “ reed ” ) , from Sumerian 𒄀𒈾 ( gi.na ) .

cane ( third-person singular simple present canes , present participle caning , simple past and past participle caned )

From the Latin canem , accusative form of canis , from Proto-Italic *kō (accusative *kwanem ), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱwṓ (accusative *ḱwónm̥ ). Compare Portuguese cão .

cane   f ( oblique plural canes , nominative singular cane , nominative plural canes )

1 The hollow jointed stem of a tall grass, especially bamboo or sugar cane, or the stem of a slender palm such as rattan.

2 A length of cane or a slender stick, especially one used as a support for plants, a walking stick, or an instrument of punishment.

Do you have a function or a wedding to plan? Naturally Cane offers a select range of furniture available to you for hire. Enquire direct for pricing and further details.

1 The hollow jointed stem of a tall grass, especially bamboo or sugar cane, or the stem of a slender palm such as rattan.

2 A length of cane or a slender stick, especially one used as a support for plants, a walking stick, or an instrument of punishment.

Do you have a function or a wedding to plan? Naturally Cane offers a select range of furniture available to you for hire. Enquire direct for pricing and further details.

Borrowing from Old French cane ( “ sugar cane ” ) , from Latin canna ( “ reed ” ) , from Ancient Greek κάννα ( kánna ) , from Akkadian 𒄀 ( qanû , “ reed ” ) , from Sumerian 𒄀𒈾 ( gi.na ) .

cane ( third-person singular simple present canes , present participle caning , simple past and past participle caned )

From the Latin canem , accusative form of canis , from Proto-Italic *kō (accusative *kwanem ), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱwṓ (accusative *ḱwónm̥ ). Compare Portuguese cão .

cane   f ( oblique plural canes , nominative singular cane , nominative plural canes )

The Persians, followed by the Greeks, discovered the famous "reeds that produce honey without bees" in India between the 6th and 4th centuries BC. They adopted and then spread sugarcane agriculture. [4] Merchants began to trade in sugar from India, which was considered a luxury and an expensive spice. In the 18th century AD, sugarcane plantations began in Caribbean, South American, Indian Ocean and Pacific island nations and the need for laborers became a major driver of large human migrations, including slave labor [5] and indentured servants . [6]

Sugarcane is indigenous to tropical South and Southeast Asia . [9] Different species likely originated in different locations, with Saccharum barberi originating in India and S. edule and S. officinarum in New Guinea . [9] The earliest known production of crystalline sugar began in northern India. The exact date of the first cane sugar production is unclear. The earliest evidence of sugar production comes from ancient Sanskrit and Pali texts. [10]

Around the 8th century, Muslim and Arab traders introduced sugar from South Asia to the other parts of the Abbasid Caliphate in the Mediterranean , Mesopotamia , Egypt , North Africa , and Andalusia . By the 10th century, sources state that no village in Mesopotamia did not grow sugarcane. [8] It was among the early crops brought to the Americas by the Spanish, mainly Andalusians, from their fields in the Canary Islands , and the Portuguese from their fields in the Madeira Islands .

France found its sugarcane islands so valuable that it effectively traded its portion of Canada , famously dubbed " a few acres of snow ", to Britain for their return of Guadeloupe , Martinique and St. Lucia at the end of the Seven Years' War . The Dutch similarly kept Suriname , a sugar colony in South America , instead of seeking the return of the New Netherlands (New York).

The then British colony of Queensland , now a state of Australia , coerced (or " blackbirded ") between 55,000 and 62,500 (estimates vary) people from the South Pacific Islands to work on sugarcane plantations between 1863 and 1900. [17]

Cuban sugar derived from sugarcane was exported to the USSR , where it received price supports and was ensured a guaranteed market. The 1991 dissolution of the Soviet state forced the closure of most of Cuba's sugar industry.

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1 The hollow jointed stem of a tall grass, especially bamboo or sugar cane, or the stem of a slender palm such as rattan.

2 A length of cane or a slender stick, especially one used as a support for plants, a walking stick, or an instrument of punishment.

1 The hollow jointed stem of a tall grass, especially bamboo or sugar cane, or the stem of a slender palm such as rattan.

2 A length of cane or a slender stick, especially one used as a support for plants, a walking stick, or an instrument of punishment.

Do you have a function or a wedding to plan? Naturally Cane offers a select range of furniture available to you for hire. Enquire direct for pricing and further details.

Borrowing from Old French cane ( “ sugar cane ” ) , from Latin canna ( “ reed ” ) , from Ancient Greek κάννα ( kánna ) , from Akkadian 𒄀 ( qanû , “ reed ” ) , from Sumerian 𒄀𒈾 ( gi.na ) .

cane ( third-person singular simple present canes , present participle caning , simple past and past participle caned )

From the Latin canem , accusative form of canis , from Proto-Italic *kō (accusative *kwanem ), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱwṓ (accusative *ḱwónm̥ ). Compare Portuguese cão .

cane   f ( oblique plural canes , nominative singular cane , nominative plural canes )

The Persians, followed by the Greeks, discovered the famous "reeds that produce honey without bees" in India between the 6th and 4th centuries BC. They adopted and then spread sugarcane agriculture. [4] Merchants began to trade in sugar from India, which was considered a luxury and an expensive spice. In the 18th century AD, sugarcane plantations began in Caribbean, South American, Indian Ocean and Pacific island nations and the need for laborers became a major driver of large human migrations, including slave labor [5] and indentured servants . [6]

Sugarcane is indigenous to tropical South and Southeast Asia . [9] Different species likely originated in different locations, with Saccharum barberi originating in India and S. edule and S. officinarum in New Guinea . [9] The earliest known production of crystalline sugar began in northern India. The exact date of the first cane sugar production is unclear. The earliest evidence of sugar production comes from ancient Sanskrit and Pali texts. [10]

Around the 8th century, Muslim and Arab traders introduced sugar from South Asia to the other parts of the Abbasid Caliphate in the Mediterranean , Mesopotamia , Egypt , North Africa , and Andalusia . By the 10th century, sources state that no village in Mesopotamia did not grow sugarcane. [8] It was among the early crops brought to the Americas by the Spanish, mainly Andalusians, from their fields in the Canary Islands , and the Portuguese from their fields in the Madeira Islands .

France found its sugarcane islands so valuable that it effectively traded its portion of Canada , famously dubbed " a few acres of snow ", to Britain for their return of Guadeloupe , Martinique and St. Lucia at the end of the Seven Years' War . The Dutch similarly kept Suriname , a sugar colony in South America , instead of seeking the return of the New Netherlands (New York).

The then British colony of Queensland , now a state of Australia , coerced (or " blackbirded ") between 55,000 and 62,500 (estimates vary) people from the South Pacific Islands to work on sugarcane plantations between 1863 and 1900. [17]

Cuban sugar derived from sugarcane was exported to the USSR , where it received price supports and was ensured a guaranteed market. The 1991 dissolution of the Soviet state forced the closure of most of Cuba's sugar industry.


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