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G.I. Joe Volume 3: Malfunction: Josh Blaylock, Various.


G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero (also known as G.I. Joe vol. 2 or G.I. Joe: Reinstated ) is a comic book that was published by Image Comics from 2001 to 2005. Based on Hasbro, Inc.'s G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero line of military-themed toys, the series picks up seven years after the end of the Marvel Comics series, and has been credited for bringing back attention to other 1980s properties such as Transformers , Masters of the Universe and Voltron . [ citation needed ]

In July 2001, Devil's Due acquired the rights to G.I. Joe, and released a four-issue limited series through Image Comics , written by Josh Blaylock with John Larter and Steve Kurth as the artists. The title quickly became known to the fans as A Real American Hero vol. 2 (following from Marvel's original series), or G.I. Joe Reinstated (the title of the first four-issue arc). Strong sales on the limited series led to it being upgraded to an ongoing series, with the publication of a fifth issue and a monthly schedule.

The new series picked up seven years after the end of the Marvel Comics series, and also used elements from the animated TV series. Several older characters were featured in the title alongside several new recruits. While primarily continuing the stories from the Marvel Comics series, the success of the G.I. Joe comic allowed Devil's Due to branch out with more properties, and experiment with creating their own continuities. Devil's Due eventually broke off from Image to become their own company, and took over the publishing of the book with issue #26. The series ended with issue #43, and the introduction of a new enemy, the Red Shadows. [1]

The series was relaunched as a new series G.I. Joe: America's Elite , which lasted for 36 issues, and was cancelled when Devil's Due's license with Hasbro expired in 2008 and was not renewed. [2]

A comics convention special was released before the first issue. [3] IDW Publishing reprinted the entirety of the Devil's Due G.I. Joe run, under a "Disavowed" banner (as IDW would begin their own continuation to the original Marvel series in 2010, which ignored the DDP run), with five trade paperback collections of the original DDP series, as well as five collections of the America's Elite series. [4]

Destro reveals a plan to take over a highly powerful communications satellite, which carries the radio waves to control nano-mites that have been planted in thousands of phones, computers and appliances. Hawk publicly announces the reinstatement of the G.I. Joe Team, which is seen by members of Cobra, including Zartan's daughter Zanya . Destro has his general Mistress Armada prepare for the arrival of G.I. Joe. A team led by Roadblock, Scarlett, Snake Eyes, Stalker and Gung-Ho suffers casualties in Florida, as Scarlett and Snake Eyes are taken prisoner by Destro, who is revealed to be Destro's son Alexander masquerading as his father. [6]

Based on the Fairchild Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II , it originally appeared in 1984 as the primary attack plane of the terrorist Cobra Organization . [2] The toy came with a mercenary Cobra pilot codenamed " Wild Weasel " and was intended as Cobra's answer to the " G.I. Joe Skystriker ," which had been added to the toyline a year earlier (which was itself a virtual copy of the USN F-14 Tomcat — the Skystriker was designated as an "XP-14F").

As mentioned, the Cobra Rattler was clearly based on the A-10 Thunderbolt II. Primary modifications included moving the A-10's fuselage-mounted engines to the wings (in order to facilitate a VTOL system in which the Rattler's wings pivoted on their axis to redirect engine exhaust downwards), [3] the addition of a third engine, mounted on the back of the plane between the vertical tail stabilizers, and the addition of a dorsal-mounted, manned gun turret. [4]

Although ostensibly remaining a ground-attack aircraft like the A-10, in both the cartoon and comic book the Rattler was often depicted more as a fighter. This was undoubtedly due in part to the lack of a more appropriate Cobra fighter being produced by Hasbro early on in the toyline; however, it was also likely due to the rivalry, depicted in both the comic book and cartoons, between the Rattler pilot "Wild Weasel" and the Skystriker pilot "Ace". Regardless, the plane would become Cobra's primary aircraft throughout most of the original cartoons and comic books, and indeed perhaps one of the most iconic and well-remembered models from the toyline.

The original toy version of the Cobra Rattler came armed with dorsal-mounted dual machine guns turret, a nose-mounted anti-tank Gatling gun , four air-to-air missiles, two large anti-tank bombs, two anti-tank bombs with detachable warheads, and two bomb racks with three bombs each. [5]

The mold used for the Cobra Rattler was reused in 1988 to make the "Tiger Rat" as part of the G.I. Joe special missions force "Tiger Force" (with pilot " Skystriker "). [6] In 1997, it was released again as the "A-10 Thunderbolt" (with pilots " Ace " and " General Hawk "), and once again in 2002 as the "Cobra Rattler" with pilot "Wild Weasel". Each new version has included a new paint job and new pilots. The 2002 model also included slight modifications to include electronic sound.

A Rattler is used to attack the funeral of General Flagg . It is shot down by Duke and Roadblock before anyone is hurt. The pilot is killed; the plane crashes into an open field. [7]

This year marks the tenth anniversary of Janet Jackson 's infamous "wardrobe malfunction" Super Bowl halftime show. But the scandalous event has had a life long beyond the split-second during which Janet's breast was bared. Here now, a timeline of the Super Bowl's most controversial performance, from the planning, to the moment itself, to the current, still-going legal wrangling.

December 9th, 2003
For the Super Bowl XXXVIII halftime show at Houston’s Reliant Stadium, MTV – producing their second straight halftime performance – recruits a lineup that includes Justin Timberlake , Nelly, Diddy, Kid Rock and Janet Jackson. NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue says in a statement at the time, "We are pleased that a star like Janet Jackson will join the roster of entertainers who have made the Super Bowl Halftime so special."

February 1st, 2004 
Even before the Janet incident, Kid Rock riled up the TV audience by wearing sleeveless stars-and-stripes poncho during his portion of the halftime show. Many viewers complained to the FCC that Rock’s wardrobe constituted desecration of the American flag. Sexually suggestive dance moves courtesy of fellow halftime performers Nelly and Diddy also helped put prude viewers on edge before the Nipple-gate opened.

February 1st, 2004 (Janet takes the stage)
The Janet Jackson-centric portion of the halftime show goes smoothly as the singer performs "Rhythm Nation" and "All for You." However, producers opted to have Jackson remain onstage for Justin Timberlake’s halftime closing slot. (Similarly, if hometown girl Beyoncé was asked to perform at the halftime instead of delivering "The Star-Spangled Banner," we could have avoided what came next.)

No one remembers the second half of the Super Bowl. (Seriously, name one down that happened in the 3 rd quarter.) The New England Patriots win. Tom Brady is named MVP. The spotlight goes rushing back toward Janet Jackson.

February 1st, 2004 (after the game)
The world waits for some kind of post-game response from Jackson, but the singer immediately flew out of Houston following her performance and before the Super Bowl even ended. Jackson’s spokesperson calls the reveal "was a malfunction of the wardrobe; it was not intentional. . [Timberlake] was supposed to pull away the bustier and leave the red-lace bra," which was visibly in Timberlake’s hand following the pull. Jackson also admits that neither MTV nor CBS had any role or previous knowledge in the incident, saying Timberlake’s ripping of the wardrobe was a late addition during their final rehearsal.

G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero (also known as G.I. Joe vol. 2 or G.I. Joe: Reinstated ) is a comic book that was published by Image Comics from 2001 to 2005. Based on Hasbro, Inc.'s G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero line of military-themed toys, the series picks up seven years after the end of the Marvel Comics series, and has been credited for bringing back attention to other 1980s properties such as Transformers , Masters of the Universe and Voltron . [ citation needed ]

In July 2001, Devil's Due acquired the rights to G.I. Joe, and released a four-issue limited series through Image Comics , written by Josh Blaylock with John Larter and Steve Kurth as the artists. The title quickly became known to the fans as A Real American Hero vol. 2 (following from Marvel's original series), or G.I. Joe Reinstated (the title of the first four-issue arc). Strong sales on the limited series led to it being upgraded to an ongoing series, with the publication of a fifth issue and a monthly schedule.

The new series picked up seven years after the end of the Marvel Comics series, and also used elements from the animated TV series. Several older characters were featured in the title alongside several new recruits. While primarily continuing the stories from the Marvel Comics series, the success of the G.I. Joe comic allowed Devil's Due to branch out with more properties, and experiment with creating their own continuities. Devil's Due eventually broke off from Image to become their own company, and took over the publishing of the book with issue #26. The series ended with issue #43, and the introduction of a new enemy, the Red Shadows. [1]

The series was relaunched as a new series G.I. Joe: America's Elite , which lasted for 36 issues, and was cancelled when Devil's Due's license with Hasbro expired in 2008 and was not renewed. [2]

A comics convention special was released before the first issue. [3] IDW Publishing reprinted the entirety of the Devil's Due G.I. Joe run, under a "Disavowed" banner (as IDW would begin their own continuation to the original Marvel series in 2010, which ignored the DDP run), with five trade paperback collections of the original DDP series, as well as five collections of the America's Elite series. [4]

Destro reveals a plan to take over a highly powerful communications satellite, which carries the radio waves to control nano-mites that have been planted in thousands of phones, computers and appliances. Hawk publicly announces the reinstatement of the G.I. Joe Team, which is seen by members of Cobra, including Zartan's daughter Zanya . Destro has his general Mistress Armada prepare for the arrival of G.I. Joe. A team led by Roadblock, Scarlett, Snake Eyes, Stalker and Gung-Ho suffers casualties in Florida, as Scarlett and Snake Eyes are taken prisoner by Destro, who is revealed to be Destro's son Alexander masquerading as his father. [6]

Based on the Fairchild Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II , it originally appeared in 1984 as the primary attack plane of the terrorist Cobra Organization . [2] The toy came with a mercenary Cobra pilot codenamed " Wild Weasel " and was intended as Cobra's answer to the " G.I. Joe Skystriker ," which had been added to the toyline a year earlier (which was itself a virtual copy of the USN F-14 Tomcat — the Skystriker was designated as an "XP-14F").

As mentioned, the Cobra Rattler was clearly based on the A-10 Thunderbolt II. Primary modifications included moving the A-10's fuselage-mounted engines to the wings (in order to facilitate a VTOL system in which the Rattler's wings pivoted on their axis to redirect engine exhaust downwards), [3] the addition of a third engine, mounted on the back of the plane between the vertical tail stabilizers, and the addition of a dorsal-mounted, manned gun turret. [4]

Although ostensibly remaining a ground-attack aircraft like the A-10, in both the cartoon and comic book the Rattler was often depicted more as a fighter. This was undoubtedly due in part to the lack of a more appropriate Cobra fighter being produced by Hasbro early on in the toyline; however, it was also likely due to the rivalry, depicted in both the comic book and cartoons, between the Rattler pilot "Wild Weasel" and the Skystriker pilot "Ace". Regardless, the plane would become Cobra's primary aircraft throughout most of the original cartoons and comic books, and indeed perhaps one of the most iconic and well-remembered models from the toyline.

The original toy version of the Cobra Rattler came armed with dorsal-mounted dual machine guns turret, a nose-mounted anti-tank Gatling gun , four air-to-air missiles, two large anti-tank bombs, two anti-tank bombs with detachable warheads, and two bomb racks with three bombs each. [5]

The mold used for the Cobra Rattler was reused in 1988 to make the "Tiger Rat" as part of the G.I. Joe special missions force "Tiger Force" (with pilot " Skystriker "). [6] In 1997, it was released again as the "A-10 Thunderbolt" (with pilots " Ace " and " General Hawk "), and once again in 2002 as the "Cobra Rattler" with pilot "Wild Weasel". Each new version has included a new paint job and new pilots. The 2002 model also included slight modifications to include electronic sound.

A Rattler is used to attack the funeral of General Flagg . It is shot down by Duke and Roadblock before anyone is hurt. The pilot is killed; the plane crashes into an open field. [7]

G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero (also known as G.I. Joe vol. 2 or G.I. Joe: Reinstated ) is a comic book that was published by Image Comics from 2001 to 2005. Based on Hasbro, Inc.'s G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero line of military-themed toys, the series picks up seven years after the end of the Marvel Comics series, and has been credited for bringing back attention to other 1980s properties such as Transformers , Masters of the Universe and Voltron . [ citation needed ]

In July 2001, Devil's Due acquired the rights to G.I. Joe, and released a four-issue limited series through Image Comics , written by Josh Blaylock with John Larter and Steve Kurth as the artists. The title quickly became known to the fans as A Real American Hero vol. 2 (following from Marvel's original series), or G.I. Joe Reinstated (the title of the first four-issue arc). Strong sales on the limited series led to it being upgraded to an ongoing series, with the publication of a fifth issue and a monthly schedule.

The new series picked up seven years after the end of the Marvel Comics series, and also used elements from the animated TV series. Several older characters were featured in the title alongside several new recruits. While primarily continuing the stories from the Marvel Comics series, the success of the G.I. Joe comic allowed Devil's Due to branch out with more properties, and experiment with creating their own continuities. Devil's Due eventually broke off from Image to become their own company, and took over the publishing of the book with issue #26. The series ended with issue #43, and the introduction of a new enemy, the Red Shadows. [1]

The series was relaunched as a new series G.I. Joe: America's Elite , which lasted for 36 issues, and was cancelled when Devil's Due's license with Hasbro expired in 2008 and was not renewed. [2]

A comics convention special was released before the first issue. [3] IDW Publishing reprinted the entirety of the Devil's Due G.I. Joe run, under a "Disavowed" banner (as IDW would begin their own continuation to the original Marvel series in 2010, which ignored the DDP run), with five trade paperback collections of the original DDP series, as well as five collections of the America's Elite series. [4]

Destro reveals a plan to take over a highly powerful communications satellite, which carries the radio waves to control nano-mites that have been planted in thousands of phones, computers and appliances. Hawk publicly announces the reinstatement of the G.I. Joe Team, which is seen by members of Cobra, including Zartan's daughter Zanya . Destro has his general Mistress Armada prepare for the arrival of G.I. Joe. A team led by Roadblock, Scarlett, Snake Eyes, Stalker and Gung-Ho suffers casualties in Florida, as Scarlett and Snake Eyes are taken prisoner by Destro, who is revealed to be Destro's son Alexander masquerading as his father. [6]


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