Menu:

Spock Must Die! | Memory Alpha | FANDOM powered by Wikia


In 1970, James Blish published the first original Star Trek novel. Last week, I found myself unexpectedly in possession of a copy.

Star Trek has always dealt in the mysterious and exotic, and how these things will be seen and understood in the future. In Spock Must Die , Blish wrestles with the exotic mysteries of transporters, women, twins, and Mr. Spock.

The book opens with McCoy and Scotty arguing over what happens when a person is transported. McCoy asserts that they are killed and copied. Scotty claims that such a thing is impossible. Scotty is concerned about conversion of matter, and McCoy is concerned about immortal souls. Kirk leaves this cozy philosophical argument when Spock informs him that Organia, the planet from the Season 1 episode “ Errand of Mercy ,” has been destroyed and the Federation appears to be at war with the Klingon Empire. The Enterprise is on the far side of the Klingon Empire, which creates communication difficulties and makes for a long hike home.

While the ship is headed over to the neutral zone on the other side of Klingon space, Scotty decides to run some experiments with the transporter. He’s going to make a tachyon copy of someone, which will, in theory, allow that person to stay on the Enterprise while some of their particles go elsewhere, come back, report on what they observed, and then somehow cease to exist. The plan is to send the tachyon copy to Organia to check things out and report back.

As far as anyone in the story knows at this point, Organia has been destroyed. So really, Scotty is creating a tachyon copy of someone to float in the dust cloud where Organia used to be, which sounds like it would be fatally destructive to anything remotely approaching a copy of a complex life form. Naturally, they plan to send Spock. There’s no way this can work. Instead, Scotty makes a non-tachyon copy of Spock, completely indistinguishable from the original.

Option 1 –-Spock Sandwich! Chapel and Rand both get a gleam in their eye. Kirk reports his confusion on this issue in an internal monologue,

Spock Must Die! (ISBN 0-553-24634-8) is a Star Trek novel by James Blish released in 1970. It was published by Bantam Books . It is notable as the first of hundreds of original novels aimed at adult readers to be based upon the Star Trek franchise.

The Klingon Empire manages to imprison the Organians and begin another war with the Federation. Captain Kirk and the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise find themselves far behind enemy lines.

Scotty has figured out a way to use tachyons to send a duplicate of Mr. Spock to Organia faster, without having to travel through Klingon space, but something has gone terribly wrong. As a result, there are now two Mr. Spocks. Eventually, one of them turns out to be an evil saboteur and has to be destroyed... but which one?

The Original Series  · The Next Generation  · Deep Space Nine  · DS9 relaunch  · Voyager  · Enterprise  · ENT relaunch

In 1970, James Blish published the first original Star Trek novel. Last week, I found myself unexpectedly in possession of a copy.

Star Trek has always dealt in the mysterious and exotic, and how these things will be seen and understood in the future. In Spock Must Die , Blish wrestles with the exotic mysteries of transporters, women, twins, and Mr. Spock.

The book opens with McCoy and Scotty arguing over what happens when a person is transported. McCoy asserts that they are killed and copied. Scotty claims that such a thing is impossible. Scotty is concerned about conversion of matter, and McCoy is concerned about immortal souls. Kirk leaves this cozy philosophical argument when Spock informs him that Organia, the planet from the Season 1 episode “ Errand of Mercy ,” has been destroyed and the Federation appears to be at war with the Klingon Empire. The Enterprise is on the far side of the Klingon Empire, which creates communication difficulties and makes for a long hike home.

While the ship is headed over to the neutral zone on the other side of Klingon space, Scotty decides to run some experiments with the transporter. He’s going to make a tachyon copy of someone, which will, in theory, allow that person to stay on the Enterprise while some of their particles go elsewhere, come back, report on what they observed, and then somehow cease to exist. The plan is to send the tachyon copy to Organia to check things out and report back.

As far as anyone in the story knows at this point, Organia has been destroyed. So really, Scotty is creating a tachyon copy of someone to float in the dust cloud where Organia used to be, which sounds like it would be fatally destructive to anything remotely approaching a copy of a complex life form. Naturally, they plan to send Spock. There’s no way this can work. Instead, Scotty makes a non-tachyon copy of Spock, completely indistinguishable from the original.

Option 1 –-Spock Sandwich! Chapel and Rand both get a gleam in their eye. Kirk reports his confusion on this issue in an internal monologue,


51A3G24VZVL