Menu:

Oasis - The Importance Of Being Idle - Official Video.


Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest: A Trivial Comedy for Serious People was first published in 1899 by Leonard Smithers and company of London, and was dedicated to Wilde’s friend and eventual literary executor, Robbie Ross. The play was first staged at the St. James’s Theatre in London on 14 February 1895 and played concurrently with An Ideal Husband . [1]

There are several mentioned past triggers which help to establish the structure of the play. First and foremost is the past of Jack Worthing who was forgotten in a bag at Victoria train Station and was raised by the person to whom the bag was accidentally handed. His current maid Miss Prism is the person who confused the baby Jack Worthing’s perambulator and her bag where she had put the manuscripts of her novel.

The play starts in Algernon’s house, and it is a kind of union. Algy speaks with his servant Lane; Algy seems a dandy who is overly selfish and boastful. He is rich enough to have servants in his estate, and this situation clears that the play is about aristocracy or upper-classes. The eloquent and delicate usage of the language gives the play a serious tone, whereas Wilde warns his audience with the topic that it is a trivial comedy for serious people. The poignant language is one of the most important aspects of the play which creates the atmosphere for a higher class world.

The exposition in the play is that Jack – Ernest wants to get married with Gwendolen but her mother doesn’t allow their union. Jack tells Algernon that “I am in love with Gwendolen. I have come up to town expressly to propose to her.” (p. 71) His unknown past, however, seems to be a mystery which is the real obstacle between Gwendolen and him, and Lady Bracknell does not hesitate to indicate that; “I would strongly advise you, Mr. Worthing, to try and acquire some relations as soon as possible, and to make a definite effort to produce at any rate one parent, of either sex, before the season is over.’ (p.90)

The exposition in the play stems from the cigarette case that Jack forgot in Algernon’s house on which the words “From little Cecily with her fondest love” is inscribed. The case of the cigarette case compels Jack to explain Algy his mysterious ‘Cecily’ and past. Since he is eager to marry Algy’s cousin Gwendolen, Algy tries to find more about Cecily; “And before I allow you to marry her, you will have to clear up the whole question of Cecily.” [2]

The inciting attack is on the deception that Jack uses Earnest as his real name. Gwendolen tells him that her “ideal has always been to love someone of the name of Ernest.” Another important disturbance to Jack’s affair with her is Gwendolen’s mother Lady Bracknell. She doesn’t wish her daughter to get married Jack. These two points seem the most important disturbances to the plot since they create the questions of whether Jack will be able to marry Gwendolen or not.

Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest: A Trivial Comedy for Serious People was first published in 1899 by Leonard Smithers and company of London, and was dedicated to Wilde’s friend and eventual literary executor, Robbie Ross. The play was first staged at the St. James’s Theatre in London on 14 February 1895 and played concurrently with An Ideal Husband . [1]

There are several mentioned past triggers which help to establish the structure of the play. First and foremost is the past of Jack Worthing who was forgotten in a bag at Victoria train Station and was raised by the person to whom the bag was accidentally handed. His current maid Miss Prism is the person who confused the baby Jack Worthing’s perambulator and her bag where she had put the manuscripts of her novel.

The play starts in Algernon’s house, and it is a kind of union. Algy speaks with his servant Lane; Algy seems a dandy who is overly selfish and boastful. He is rich enough to have servants in his estate, and this situation clears that the play is about aristocracy or upper-classes. The eloquent and delicate usage of the language gives the play a serious tone, whereas Wilde warns his audience with the topic that it is a trivial comedy for serious people. The poignant language is one of the most important aspects of the play which creates the atmosphere for a higher class world.

The exposition in the play is that Jack – Ernest wants to get married with Gwendolen but her mother doesn’t allow their union. Jack tells Algernon that “I am in love with Gwendolen. I have come up to town expressly to propose to her.” (p. 71) His unknown past, however, seems to be a mystery which is the real obstacle between Gwendolen and him, and Lady Bracknell does not hesitate to indicate that; “I would strongly advise you, Mr. Worthing, to try and acquire some relations as soon as possible, and to make a definite effort to produce at any rate one parent, of either sex, before the season is over.’ (p.90)

The exposition in the play stems from the cigarette case that Jack forgot in Algernon’s house on which the words “From little Cecily with her fondest love” is inscribed. The case of the cigarette case compels Jack to explain Algy his mysterious ‘Cecily’ and past. Since he is eager to marry Algy’s cousin Gwendolen, Algy tries to find more about Cecily; “And before I allow you to marry her, you will have to clear up the whole question of Cecily.” [2]

The inciting attack is on the deception that Jack uses Earnest as his real name. Gwendolen tells him that her “ideal has always been to love someone of the name of Ernest.” Another important disturbance to Jack’s affair with her is Gwendolen’s mother Lady Bracknell. She doesn’t wish her daughter to get married Jack. These two points seem the most important disturbances to the plot since they create the questions of whether Jack will be able to marry Gwendolen or not.

In Act 2 of The Importance of Being Earnest , Oscar Wilde gains most of his humor through situational irony, that is, things that are the opposite of what is expected. At the beginning of the scene, Miss Prism scorns "this modern mania for turning bad people into good people at a moment's notice." This is ironic in two respects: first, most people would favor a sinner's reformation and second, true reformation rarely happens instantaneously.

In Act 2 of The Importance of Being Earnest , Oscar Wilde gains most of his humor through situational irony, that is, things that are the opposite of what is expected. At the beginning of the scene, Miss Prism scorns "this modern mania for turning bad people into good people at a moment's notice." This is ironic in two respects: first, most people would favor a sinner's reformation and second, true reformation rarely happens instantaneously.

Next Cecily admonishes Algy, who is pretending to be Ernest, "I hope you have not been leading a double life, pretending to be wicked and being really good all the time. That would be hypocrisy." Again, the irony works on two levels: first, the usual way a hypocrite acts is to pretend to be good while really being wicked, and second, Algy actually is pretending here, although Cecily doesn't know it. That is dramatic irony, where the audience knows something a character doesn't.

When Algy says that good looks "are a snare that every sensible man would like to be caught in," his remark is ironic in that a snare, by definition, takes one against one's will.

Miss Prism, upon learning that Ernest is dead, says, "What a lesson for him! I trust he will profit by it." Her remark is humorously ironic since dead men cannot profit from life's lessons.

Jack's unthinking reply to Cecily, "I haven't got a brother!" is ironic in that without realizing it he denies the lie that he has worked so hard to perpetrate, and when he tells the literal truth, Cecily won't accept it, mistaking his answer for a figurative disowning of his brother.

Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest: A Trivial Comedy for Serious People was first published in 1899 by Leonard Smithers and company of London, and was dedicated to Wilde’s friend and eventual literary executor, Robbie Ross. The play was first staged at the St. James’s Theatre in London on 14 February 1895 and played concurrently with An Ideal Husband . [1]

There are several mentioned past triggers which help to establish the structure of the play. First and foremost is the past of Jack Worthing who was forgotten in a bag at Victoria train Station and was raised by the person to whom the bag was accidentally handed. His current maid Miss Prism is the person who confused the baby Jack Worthing’s perambulator and her bag where she had put the manuscripts of her novel.

The play starts in Algernon’s house, and it is a kind of union. Algy speaks with his servant Lane; Algy seems a dandy who is overly selfish and boastful. He is rich enough to have servants in his estate, and this situation clears that the play is about aristocracy or upper-classes. The eloquent and delicate usage of the language gives the play a serious tone, whereas Wilde warns his audience with the topic that it is a trivial comedy for serious people. The poignant language is one of the most important aspects of the play which creates the atmosphere for a higher class world.

The exposition in the play is that Jack – Ernest wants to get married with Gwendolen but her mother doesn’t allow their union. Jack tells Algernon that “I am in love with Gwendolen. I have come up to town expressly to propose to her.” (p. 71) His unknown past, however, seems to be a mystery which is the real obstacle between Gwendolen and him, and Lady Bracknell does not hesitate to indicate that; “I would strongly advise you, Mr. Worthing, to try and acquire some relations as soon as possible, and to make a definite effort to produce at any rate one parent, of either sex, before the season is over.’ (p.90)

The exposition in the play stems from the cigarette case that Jack forgot in Algernon’s house on which the words “From little Cecily with her fondest love” is inscribed. The case of the cigarette case compels Jack to explain Algy his mysterious ‘Cecily’ and past. Since he is eager to marry Algy’s cousin Gwendolen, Algy tries to find more about Cecily; “And before I allow you to marry her, you will have to clear up the whole question of Cecily.” [2]

The inciting attack is on the deception that Jack uses Earnest as his real name. Gwendolen tells him that her “ideal has always been to love someone of the name of Ernest.” Another important disturbance to Jack’s affair with her is Gwendolen’s mother Lady Bracknell. She doesn’t wish her daughter to get married Jack. These two points seem the most important disturbances to the plot since they create the questions of whether Jack will be able to marry Gwendolen or not.

In Act 2 of The Importance of Being Earnest , Oscar Wilde gains most of his humor through situational irony, that is, things that are the opposite of what is expected. At the beginning of the scene, Miss Prism scorns "this modern mania for turning bad people into good people at a moment's notice." This is ironic in two respects: first, most people would favor a sinner's reformation and second, true reformation rarely happens instantaneously.

In Act 2 of The Importance of Being Earnest , Oscar Wilde gains most of his humor through situational irony, that is, things that are the opposite of what is expected. At the beginning of the scene, Miss Prism scorns "this modern mania for turning bad people into good people at a moment's notice." This is ironic in two respects: first, most people would favor a sinner's reformation and second, true reformation rarely happens instantaneously.

Next Cecily admonishes Algy, who is pretending to be Ernest, "I hope you have not been leading a double life, pretending to be wicked and being really good all the time. That would be hypocrisy." Again, the irony works on two levels: first, the usual way a hypocrite acts is to pretend to be good while really being wicked, and second, Algy actually is pretending here, although Cecily doesn't know it. That is dramatic irony, where the audience knows something a character doesn't.

When Algy says that good looks "are a snare that every sensible man would like to be caught in," his remark is ironic in that a snare, by definition, takes one against one's will.

Miss Prism, upon learning that Ernest is dead, says, "What a lesson for him! I trust he will profit by it." Her remark is humorously ironic since dead men cannot profit from life's lessons.

Jack's unthinking reply to Cecily, "I haven't got a brother!" is ironic in that without realizing it he denies the lie that he has worked so hard to perpetrate, and when he tells the literal truth, Cecily won't accept it, mistaking his answer for a figurative disowning of his brother.

c.1500, from Middle French importance or directly from Medieval Latin importantia , from importantem (see important ).

Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest: A Trivial Comedy for Serious People was first published in 1899 by Leonard Smithers and company of London, and was dedicated to Wilde’s friend and eventual literary executor, Robbie Ross. The play was first staged at the St. James’s Theatre in London on 14 February 1895 and played concurrently with An Ideal Husband . [1]

There are several mentioned past triggers which help to establish the structure of the play. First and foremost is the past of Jack Worthing who was forgotten in a bag at Victoria train Station and was raised by the person to whom the bag was accidentally handed. His current maid Miss Prism is the person who confused the baby Jack Worthing’s perambulator and her bag where she had put the manuscripts of her novel.

The play starts in Algernon’s house, and it is a kind of union. Algy speaks with his servant Lane; Algy seems a dandy who is overly selfish and boastful. He is rich enough to have servants in his estate, and this situation clears that the play is about aristocracy or upper-classes. The eloquent and delicate usage of the language gives the play a serious tone, whereas Wilde warns his audience with the topic that it is a trivial comedy for serious people. The poignant language is one of the most important aspects of the play which creates the atmosphere for a higher class world.

The exposition in the play is that Jack – Ernest wants to get married with Gwendolen but her mother doesn’t allow their union. Jack tells Algernon that “I am in love with Gwendolen. I have come up to town expressly to propose to her.” (p. 71) His unknown past, however, seems to be a mystery which is the real obstacle between Gwendolen and him, and Lady Bracknell does not hesitate to indicate that; “I would strongly advise you, Mr. Worthing, to try and acquire some relations as soon as possible, and to make a definite effort to produce at any rate one parent, of either sex, before the season is over.’ (p.90)

The exposition in the play stems from the cigarette case that Jack forgot in Algernon’s house on which the words “From little Cecily with her fondest love” is inscribed. The case of the cigarette case compels Jack to explain Algy his mysterious ‘Cecily’ and past. Since he is eager to marry Algy’s cousin Gwendolen, Algy tries to find more about Cecily; “And before I allow you to marry her, you will have to clear up the whole question of Cecily.” [2]

The inciting attack is on the deception that Jack uses Earnest as his real name. Gwendolen tells him that her “ideal has always been to love someone of the name of Ernest.” Another important disturbance to Jack’s affair with her is Gwendolen’s mother Lady Bracknell. She doesn’t wish her daughter to get married Jack. These two points seem the most important disturbances to the plot since they create the questions of whether Jack will be able to marry Gwendolen or not.

In Act 2 of The Importance of Being Earnest , Oscar Wilde gains most of his humor through situational irony, that is, things that are the opposite of what is expected. At the beginning of the scene, Miss Prism scorns "this modern mania for turning bad people into good people at a moment's notice." This is ironic in two respects: first, most people would favor a sinner's reformation and second, true reformation rarely happens instantaneously.

In Act 2 of The Importance of Being Earnest , Oscar Wilde gains most of his humor through situational irony, that is, things that are the opposite of what is expected. At the beginning of the scene, Miss Prism scorns "this modern mania for turning bad people into good people at a moment's notice." This is ironic in two respects: first, most people would favor a sinner's reformation and second, true reformation rarely happens instantaneously.

Next Cecily admonishes Algy, who is pretending to be Ernest, "I hope you have not been leading a double life, pretending to be wicked and being really good all the time. That would be hypocrisy." Again, the irony works on two levels: first, the usual way a hypocrite acts is to pretend to be good while really being wicked, and second, Algy actually is pretending here, although Cecily doesn't know it. That is dramatic irony, where the audience knows something a character doesn't.

When Algy says that good looks "are a snare that every sensible man would like to be caught in," his remark is ironic in that a snare, by definition, takes one against one's will.

Miss Prism, upon learning that Ernest is dead, says, "What a lesson for him! I trust he will profit by it." Her remark is humorously ironic since dead men cannot profit from life's lessons.

Jack's unthinking reply to Cecily, "I haven't got a brother!" is ironic in that without realizing it he denies the lie that he has worked so hard to perpetrate, and when he tells the literal truth, Cecily won't accept it, mistaking his answer for a figurative disowning of his brother.

c.1500, from Middle French importance or directly from Medieval Latin importantia , from importantem (see important ).

"An earnest person is someone who practices diligence, seriousness, and above all sincerity. That being said, it is difficult to find a male character in Oscar Wilde ’s  " The Importance of Being Earnest " who possesses these three qualities of earnestness despite the two leading male roles portray "Ernest" part-time in the comedic play .

The beginning of the play reveals that protagonist John "Jack" Worthing has a most unusual and amusing backstory. As a baby, he was accidentally abandoned in a handbag at a railway station, and a wealthy man, Thomas Cardew, discovered and adopted him as a child. Jack was named Worthing, after the seaside resort which Cardew visited. Worthing grew up to become a wealthy land-owner and investor, who was the legal guardian of Cardew’s granddaughter, Cecily.

As the central character of the play, Jack might seem serious at first glance. He is far more proper and less ridiculous than his dandified friend, Algernon "Algy" Moncrieff. In many productions of the play, the protagonist has been portrayed in a somber, straight-faced manner. Dignified actors such as Sir John Gielgud and Colin Firth have brought Jack to life on stage and screen, adding an air of dignity and refinement to the character.

One of the reasons Jack seems comparatively serious is due to the frivolous and playful nature of his friend, Algernon Moncrieff. Of all the characters in "The Importance of Being Earnest," it is believed that Algernon is the embodiment of Oscar Wilde’s personality.

Like Jack, Algernon enjoys the pleasures of the city and high society. (He also enjoys muffins and comes off as a bit of a glutton). Unlike Jack, Algernon loves to offer urbane social commentary about class, marriage, and Victorian society. Here are a few gems of wisdom, compliments of Algernon (Oscar Wilde): According to Algernon, relationships are “Divorces are made in heaven.” About modern culture, he comments, “Oh! It is absurd to have a hard and fast rule about what one should read and what one shouldn’t. More than half of modern culture depends on what one shouldn’t read.”

“Relations are simply a tedious pack of people, who haven’t got the remotest knowledge of how to live, nor the smallest instinct about when to die.”


51B1d2m9l1L