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Winter According to Humphrey Chapter 5 - YouTube


Winter is the season of retreat and rest, when the yin (night, female, cold) is now dominant and yang (day, male, hot) energy moves inward. The trees have lost their leaves; the animals hibernate through the long, dark winter days. Winter is a time of stillness and quiet, amplifying any sound there is.

The ability to listen clearly at this time of year is sharpest… not only listening through conversation, but listening to your own body and comprehending its needs, as well as having a deeper understanding of yourself and your interactions with others

Winter is a time of gentle celebration where nutritious and warming food and family connection is promoted. Hence, many cultures have their biggest family/food festival of the year in this season – cozy gatherings promoting interaction with friends and family with plenty of warming, comforting foods and moderate amounts of warming liqueur.

On stormy or windy days, stay indoors when possible. The body qi needs to be conserved by keeping warm but not hot. Take care not to sit too close to the fire. Reduce hot showers or baths as the pores of the skin open and yang qi is easily lost. Keeping life simple and avoiding excessive lifestyles in winter is emphasized in Chinese medicine by this saying:

Keeping the feet warm through winter is essential in order to nourish Kidney  qi [1] . Less showers, more hot-water footbaths are recommended just before going to bed. If you need a hot water bottle, best to put it down by the feet. In Chinese medicine we believe the head should be relatively cool and the feet warm for proper fluid and energy movement in the body to take place. Just like the ancient Chinese landscape painting where at the top there is ice-capped mountain and below where the river runs down is a warm valley. In cold winters, good boots and thick pants most important. Think about the sayings in our own language about ‘hot-heads’ and getting ‘cold-feet’.

The common cold is often caused by an invasion of cold wind. Cold wind usually enters the body when you get cold. Prime targets are exposed necks and lower backs. 

Winter is the season of retreat and rest, when the yin (night, female, cold) is now dominant and yang (day, male, hot) energy moves inward. The trees have lost their leaves; the animals hibernate through the long, dark winter days. Winter is a time of stillness and quiet, amplifying any sound there is.

The ability to listen clearly at this time of year is sharpest… not only listening through conversation, but listening to your own body and comprehending its needs, as well as having a deeper understanding of yourself and your interactions with others

Winter is a time of gentle celebration where nutritious and warming food and family connection is promoted. Hence, many cultures have their biggest family/food festival of the year in this season – cozy gatherings promoting interaction with friends and family with plenty of warming, comforting foods and moderate amounts of warming liqueur.

On stormy or windy days, stay indoors when possible. The body qi needs to be conserved by keeping warm but not hot. Take care not to sit too close to the fire. Reduce hot showers or baths as the pores of the skin open and yang qi is easily lost. Keeping life simple and avoiding excessive lifestyles in winter is emphasized in Chinese medicine by this saying:

Keeping the feet warm through winter is essential in order to nourish Kidney  qi [1] . Less showers, more hot-water footbaths are recommended just before going to bed. If you need a hot water bottle, best to put it down by the feet. In Chinese medicine we believe the head should be relatively cool and the feet warm for proper fluid and energy movement in the body to take place. Just like the ancient Chinese landscape painting where at the top there is ice-capped mountain and below where the river runs down is a warm valley. In cold winters, good boots and thick pants most important. Think about the sayings in our own language about ‘hot-heads’ and getting ‘cold-feet’.

The common cold is often caused by an invasion of cold wind. Cold wind usually enters the body when you get cold. Prime targets are exposed necks and lower backs. 

The day in our calendar that marks the first day of winter usually refers to the astronomical seasons which are a result of the Earth's axis and orbit around the sun. However, at the Met Office we often use a meteorological definition of the seasons. Let's take a brief overview of the difference.

Astronomical seasons are relative to the position of the Earth's orbit around the sun taking into account equinoxes and solstices. Meteorological seasons are instead based on annual temperature cycles measuring the meteorological state and coinciding with the Gregorian calendar to determine a clear transition and equal length seasons.

The meteorological seasons consists of splitting the seasons into four periods made up of three months each. These seasons are split to coincide with our Gregorian calendar making it easier for meteorological observing and forecasting to compare seasonal and monthly statistics. By the meteorological calendar, winter always starts on 1 December.

The seasons are defined as spring (March, April, May), summer (June, July, August), autumn (September, October, November) and winter (December, January, February).

The astronomical calendar determines the seasons due to the 23.5 degree tilt of the Earth's rotational axis in relation to its orbit around the sun. Both equinoxes and solstices are related to the Earth's orbit around the sun.

Solstices and equinoxes are considered to be the astronomical transition points between the seasons and mark key stages in the astronomical cycle of the earth. In a year there are two equinoxes (spring and autumn) and two solstices (summer and winter). The dates of the equinoxes and solstices aren't fixed due to the Earth's elliptical orbit of the sun. The Earth's orbit around the sun means that in early January, the sun is closest (known as perihelion) and in early July it is most distant (aphelion).

Winter is the season of retreat and rest, when the yin (night, female, cold) is now dominant and yang (day, male, hot) energy moves inward. The trees have lost their leaves; the animals hibernate through the long, dark winter days. Winter is a time of stillness and quiet, amplifying any sound there is.

The ability to listen clearly at this time of year is sharpest… not only listening through conversation, but listening to your own body and comprehending its needs, as well as having a deeper understanding of yourself and your interactions with others

Winter is a time of gentle celebration where nutritious and warming food and family connection is promoted. Hence, many cultures have their biggest family/food festival of the year in this season – cozy gatherings promoting interaction with friends and family with plenty of warming, comforting foods and moderate amounts of warming liqueur.

On stormy or windy days, stay indoors when possible. The body qi needs to be conserved by keeping warm but not hot. Take care not to sit too close to the fire. Reduce hot showers or baths as the pores of the skin open and yang qi is easily lost. Keeping life simple and avoiding excessive lifestyles in winter is emphasized in Chinese medicine by this saying:

Keeping the feet warm through winter is essential in order to nourish Kidney  qi [1] . Less showers, more hot-water footbaths are recommended just before going to bed. If you need a hot water bottle, best to put it down by the feet. In Chinese medicine we believe the head should be relatively cool and the feet warm for proper fluid and energy movement in the body to take place. Just like the ancient Chinese landscape painting where at the top there is ice-capped mountain and below where the river runs down is a warm valley. In cold winters, good boots and thick pants most important. Think about the sayings in our own language about ‘hot-heads’ and getting ‘cold-feet’.

The common cold is often caused by an invasion of cold wind. Cold wind usually enters the body when you get cold. Prime targets are exposed necks and lower backs. 

The day in our calendar that marks the first day of winter usually refers to the astronomical seasons which are a result of the Earth's axis and orbit around the sun. However, at the Met Office we often use a meteorological definition of the seasons. Let's take a brief overview of the difference.

Astronomical seasons are relative to the position of the Earth's orbit around the sun taking into account equinoxes and solstices. Meteorological seasons are instead based on annual temperature cycles measuring the meteorological state and coinciding with the Gregorian calendar to determine a clear transition and equal length seasons.

The meteorological seasons consists of splitting the seasons into four periods made up of three months each. These seasons are split to coincide with our Gregorian calendar making it easier for meteorological observing and forecasting to compare seasonal and monthly statistics. By the meteorological calendar, winter always starts on 1 December.

The seasons are defined as spring (March, April, May), summer (June, July, August), autumn (September, October, November) and winter (December, January, February).

The astronomical calendar determines the seasons due to the 23.5 degree tilt of the Earth's rotational axis in relation to its orbit around the sun. Both equinoxes and solstices are related to the Earth's orbit around the sun.

Solstices and equinoxes are considered to be the astronomical transition points between the seasons and mark key stages in the astronomical cycle of the earth. In a year there are two equinoxes (spring and autumn) and two solstices (summer and winter). The dates of the equinoxes and solstices aren't fixed due to the Earth's elliptical orbit of the sun. The Earth's orbit around the sun means that in early January, the sun is closest (known as perihelion) and in early July it is most distant (aphelion).

Layering can be your bestie or your worst enemy. On one hand, layering garments staves off the chills and gives you creative freedom to use old pieces in new ways. But layering gone wrong? You end up feeling like a marshmallow with no style sense.

Well I say, no marshmallow for you! Let’s keep the layering game on point. Here are the 10 ultimate rules of winter layering, each demonstrated by an amazing layered look from Instagram.

You know that animal print coat or kimono you have in the closet, the one that’s way more aggressive than your normal, everyday style? Put that piece to work by slipping it on underneath a neutral overcoat. Just like that, you’re a style genius.

You can pair motos and blazers, double up on sweaters and even wear two complementary overcoats at the same time. Your success here lies in the order of the garments: fitted coats and very bold, patterned coats shine as under-layers. Top those pieces off with a solid-color trench or overcoat.

Try and visualize the outfit below without the white top. It’s decidedly less interesting that way, right? The contrasting white collar, hemline and sleeves provide structure so that the ensemble looks put together, and not thrown together.

Textures work as hard as colors to add interest to an outfit. So even if your winter wardrobe consists of basics, you can (and you will) combine them into unique, stylish combos — just by playing on textural differences. See the outfit by @mylovestyled below. She matches up two different ribbed knits, torn denim, leather plus metal zippers, and it all works beautifully!

Winter is the season of retreat and rest, when the yin (night, female, cold) is now dominant and yang (day, male, hot) energy moves inward. The trees have lost their leaves; the animals hibernate through the long, dark winter days. Winter is a time of stillness and quiet, amplifying any sound there is.

The ability to listen clearly at this time of year is sharpest… not only listening through conversation, but listening to your own body and comprehending its needs, as well as having a deeper understanding of yourself and your interactions with others

Winter is a time of gentle celebration where nutritious and warming food and family connection is promoted. Hence, many cultures have their biggest family/food festival of the year in this season – cozy gatherings promoting interaction with friends and family with plenty of warming, comforting foods and moderate amounts of warming liqueur.

On stormy or windy days, stay indoors when possible. The body qi needs to be conserved by keeping warm but not hot. Take care not to sit too close to the fire. Reduce hot showers or baths as the pores of the skin open and yang qi is easily lost. Keeping life simple and avoiding excessive lifestyles in winter is emphasized in Chinese medicine by this saying:

Keeping the feet warm through winter is essential in order to nourish Kidney  qi [1] . Less showers, more hot-water footbaths are recommended just before going to bed. If you need a hot water bottle, best to put it down by the feet. In Chinese medicine we believe the head should be relatively cool and the feet warm for proper fluid and energy movement in the body to take place. Just like the ancient Chinese landscape painting where at the top there is ice-capped mountain and below where the river runs down is a warm valley. In cold winters, good boots and thick pants most important. Think about the sayings in our own language about ‘hot-heads’ and getting ‘cold-feet’.

The common cold is often caused by an invasion of cold wind. Cold wind usually enters the body when you get cold. Prime targets are exposed necks and lower backs. 

The day in our calendar that marks the first day of winter usually refers to the astronomical seasons which are a result of the Earth's axis and orbit around the sun. However, at the Met Office we often use a meteorological definition of the seasons. Let's take a brief overview of the difference.

Astronomical seasons are relative to the position of the Earth's orbit around the sun taking into account equinoxes and solstices. Meteorological seasons are instead based on annual temperature cycles measuring the meteorological state and coinciding with the Gregorian calendar to determine a clear transition and equal length seasons.

The meteorological seasons consists of splitting the seasons into four periods made up of three months each. These seasons are split to coincide with our Gregorian calendar making it easier for meteorological observing and forecasting to compare seasonal and monthly statistics. By the meteorological calendar, winter always starts on 1 December.

The seasons are defined as spring (March, April, May), summer (June, July, August), autumn (September, October, November) and winter (December, January, February).

The astronomical calendar determines the seasons due to the 23.5 degree tilt of the Earth's rotational axis in relation to its orbit around the sun. Both equinoxes and solstices are related to the Earth's orbit around the sun.

Solstices and equinoxes are considered to be the astronomical transition points between the seasons and mark key stages in the astronomical cycle of the earth. In a year there are two equinoxes (spring and autumn) and two solstices (summer and winter). The dates of the equinoxes and solstices aren't fixed due to the Earth's elliptical orbit of the sun. The Earth's orbit around the sun means that in early January, the sun is closest (known as perihelion) and in early July it is most distant (aphelion).

Layering can be your bestie or your worst enemy. On one hand, layering garments staves off the chills and gives you creative freedom to use old pieces in new ways. But layering gone wrong? You end up feeling like a marshmallow with no style sense.

Well I say, no marshmallow for you! Let’s keep the layering game on point. Here are the 10 ultimate rules of winter layering, each demonstrated by an amazing layered look from Instagram.

You know that animal print coat or kimono you have in the closet, the one that’s way more aggressive than your normal, everyday style? Put that piece to work by slipping it on underneath a neutral overcoat. Just like that, you’re a style genius.

You can pair motos and blazers, double up on sweaters and even wear two complementary overcoats at the same time. Your success here lies in the order of the garments: fitted coats and very bold, patterned coats shine as under-layers. Top those pieces off with a solid-color trench or overcoat.

Try and visualize the outfit below without the white top. It’s decidedly less interesting that way, right? The contrasting white collar, hemline and sleeves provide structure so that the ensemble looks put together, and not thrown together.

Textures work as hard as colors to add interest to an outfit. So even if your winter wardrobe consists of basics, you can (and you will) combine them into unique, stylish combos — just by playing on textural differences. See the outfit by @mylovestyled below. She matches up two different ribbed knits, torn denim, leather plus metal zippers, and it all works beautifully!

Consider a tee and a tulle skirt for your next holiday party.
This pairing is so much fun, everyone should try it at least once.


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