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Amazon.com: Batman: Year One (8601200476040): Frank Miller.


The influential writer and artist announced today at Comic-Con International in San Diego that he plans rework the Man of Steel’s origin, from his discovery by the Kents in Smallville to manhood.

“Through Dark Knight I got to touch about all the [characters] at the DC pantheon, but I never really had my real, meaningful crack at Superman,” Miller told Vulture . “In the case of DC Comics, which has by far and away the strongest and richest mythology, there are those three fundamental pillars they have of Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman. All of the other characters kind of string along underneath of them, which is wonderful.”

Famously pitting Superman against Batman in 1986’s The Dark Knight Returns , Miller earned a reputation for hating the Man of Steel, a notion he dismissed in 2014 . “The Dark Knight series is all from Batman’s point of view,” he explained. “But if you look at Dark Knight 2, you’ll see a Superman who’s much calmer than the one in the first Dark Knight. Batman and Superman are dead opposites. I love Superman. Do I love Batman more? They’re not people. They’re only lines on paper.”

Miller, who returned to Superman in 205 with his heavily scrutinized cover for Dark Knight Universe Presents: The Atom #1 , revealed last fall that he would like to explore the character’s Jewish roots by returning him to the World War II era in which he was crated.

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The influential writer and artist announced today at Comic-Con International in San Diego that he plans rework the Man of Steel’s origin, from his discovery by the Kents in Smallville to manhood.

“Through Dark Knight I got to touch about all the [characters] at the DC pantheon, but I never really had my real, meaningful crack at Superman,” Miller told Vulture . “In the case of DC Comics, which has by far and away the strongest and richest mythology, there are those three fundamental pillars they have of Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman. All of the other characters kind of string along underneath of them, which is wonderful.”

Famously pitting Superman against Batman in 1986’s The Dark Knight Returns , Miller earned a reputation for hating the Man of Steel, a notion he dismissed in 2014 . “The Dark Knight series is all from Batman’s point of view,” he explained. “But if you look at Dark Knight 2, you’ll see a Superman who’s much calmer than the one in the first Dark Knight. Batman and Superman are dead opposites. I love Superman. Do I love Batman more? They’re not people. They’re only lines on paper.”

Miller, who returned to Superman in 205 with his heavily scrutinized cover for Dark Knight Universe Presents: The Atom #1 , revealed last fall that he would like to explore the character’s Jewish roots by returning him to the World War II era in which he was crated.

You're currently on {{currently_on}}. However, it looks like you listened to {{listened_to}} on {{device_name}} {{time}}.

The influential writer and artist announced today at Comic-Con International in San Diego that he plans rework the Man of Steel’s origin, from his discovery by the Kents in Smallville to manhood.

“Through Dark Knight I got to touch about all the [characters] at the DC pantheon, but I never really had my real, meaningful crack at Superman,” Miller told Vulture . “In the case of DC Comics, which has by far and away the strongest and richest mythology, there are those three fundamental pillars they have of Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman. All of the other characters kind of string along underneath of them, which is wonderful.”

Famously pitting Superman against Batman in 1986’s The Dark Knight Returns , Miller earned a reputation for hating the Man of Steel, a notion he dismissed in 2014 . “The Dark Knight series is all from Batman’s point of view,” he explained. “But if you look at Dark Knight 2, you’ll see a Superman who’s much calmer than the one in the first Dark Knight. Batman and Superman are dead opposites. I love Superman. Do I love Batman more? They’re not people. They’re only lines on paper.”

Miller, who returned to Superman in 205 with his heavily scrutinized cover for Dark Knight Universe Presents: The Atom #1 , revealed last fall that he would like to explore the character’s Jewish roots by returning him to the World War II era in which he was crated.

The influential writer and artist announced today at Comic-Con International in San Diego that he plans rework the Man of Steel’s origin, from his discovery by the Kents in Smallville to manhood.

“Through Dark Knight I got to touch about all the [characters] at the DC pantheon, but I never really had my real, meaningful crack at Superman,” Miller told Vulture . “In the case of DC Comics, which has by far and away the strongest and richest mythology, there are those three fundamental pillars they have of Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman. All of the other characters kind of string along underneath of them, which is wonderful.”

Famously pitting Superman against Batman in 1986’s The Dark Knight Returns , Miller earned a reputation for hating the Man of Steel, a notion he dismissed in 2014 . “The Dark Knight series is all from Batman’s point of view,” he explained. “But if you look at Dark Knight 2, you’ll see a Superman who’s much calmer than the one in the first Dark Knight. Batman and Superman are dead opposites. I love Superman. Do I love Batman more? They’re not people. They’re only lines on paper.”

Miller, who returned to Superman in 205 with his heavily scrutinized cover for Dark Knight Universe Presents: The Atom #1 , revealed last fall that he would like to explore the character’s Jewish roots by returning him to the World War II era in which he was crated.

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The year was 2000. After two great Tim Burton films, and two jokey Joel Schumacher films, Warner Bros. was looking to reboot the Batman franchise, with a darker, R-rated edge. They brought on Darren Aronofsky to develop the reboot.

Aronofsky was fresh off his award-winning, visually striking  Pi , but this was before his dirty, haunting Requiem for a Dream . He was going to base his Batman movie on Batman: Year One , the legendary comic book by Frank Miller, and even teamed up with him to develop the script.

In an interview with Yahoo Movies to promote his new film, Mother! (which is in theaters today), Aronofsky admitted that Joaquin Phoenix was his choice for Batman. But as we all know, Aronofsky's Batman never happened.

“It’s funny, I think we were just sort of out of time with our idea,” Aronofsky told Yahoo Movies. “I understood that [with] comics, there’s room for all different types of titles, but I think Hollywood at that time was still in the Golden Age of comics, and they were still just doing the classic titles in classic ways. I think audiences now, they’ve seen enough comic films that they’re game for that. So I think we were a little bit out of time for our idea.”


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