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Funny Christmas Poems for Children


Hi, I'm Patrick Winstanley, a living (as in alive) English poet who believes that poetry should a fun activity enjoyed with family and friends, rather than a form of torture inflicted on children by their teachers. With the help on my fellow poets Paul Curtis, Max Scratchmann and Kate Williams, I've produced an exciting and unusual collection of funny poems for kids. If you're not used to hearing the words 'poetry' and 'exciting' in the same sentence, please don't give up just yet, because these poems really are a little bit different...

If I haven't convinced you yet, perhaps the best thing is to dive straight in and try a few. As the saying goes, the proof of the poem is in the reading...

If you click on the funny poems button in the navigation on the left, you're taken to the poetry index. The poems are divided up into ten different types, which start with the cute and cuddly animal poems and end with some rather naughty poems . In between you'll find poems about families, famous people , school and sports , plus a rather odd category called odes and ends , for all the poems which didn't find a home elsewhere.

There is poetry in the collection suitable for all ages of children, from pre-school to primary school age. However, the collection is mostly aimed at junior school children, those aged between 7 and 11 years old. One section of the site, the rude poems , deserves special mention as it's really only suitable for older children. If you're not sure whether you should be reading the them, it would be a good idea to ask your Mum, Dad, teacher or a responsible adult first.

Sheep are my third favourite animal, after hippos and my cat Timmy, who you'll meet in the section called about the author's cat . (You'll have to visit the animal poems to discover my least favourite animals). Sheep are also quite intelligent, so they're not here just to make the site look pretty. As you visit the various sections of the site you'll meet different types of sheep and discover what they signify. Beware if you see a sheep sitting on the lavatory, as it means that the contents of that page may be rude.

As well as the funny verse, there are some other fun bits of the site you'll want to explore. Writing funny poetry gives a few hints on how to start writing your own comic poems and get them noticed by other people. About the author tells you a little bit about me and rather more about Timmy, my adorable little black cat who gets very upset if he isn't the centre of attention.

Emily Dickinson died in Amherst in 1886. After her death her family members found her hand-sewn books, or “fascicles.” These fascicles contained nearly 1,800 poems. Though Mabel Loomis Todd and Higginson published the first selection of her poems in 1890, a complete volume did not appear until 1955. Edited by Thomas H. Johnson, the poems still bore the editorial hand of Todd and Higginson. It was not until R.W. Franklin’s version of Dickinson’s poems appeared in 1998 that her order, unusual punctuation and spelling choices were completely restored.

All experience levels are welcome to a monthly book group moderated by library staff. In 2013, the library will ask individuals from varied backgrounds to select a title that has...

Cynthia Nixon delivers a triumphant performance as Emily Dickinson as she personifies the wit, intellectual independence and pathos of the poet whose genius only came to be recognized after her...


Emily Dickinson’s manuscripts are located in two primary collections: the Amherst College Library and the Houghton Library of Harvard University. The poems that were in Mabel Loomis Todd’s possession are at Amherst; those that remained within the Dickinson households are at the Houghton Library.
 
 

Hi, I'm Patrick Winstanley, a living (as in alive) English poet who believes that poetry should a fun activity enjoyed with family and friends, rather than a form of torture inflicted on children by their teachers. With the help on my fellow poets Paul Curtis, Max Scratchmann and Kate Williams, I've produced an exciting and unusual collection of funny poems for kids. If you're not used to hearing the words 'poetry' and 'exciting' in the same sentence, please don't give up just yet, because these poems really are a little bit different...

If I haven't convinced you yet, perhaps the best thing is to dive straight in and try a few. As the saying goes, the proof of the poem is in the reading...

If you click on the funny poems button in the navigation on the left, you're taken to the poetry index. The poems are divided up into ten different types, which start with the cute and cuddly animal poems and end with some rather naughty poems . In between you'll find poems about families, famous people , school and sports , plus a rather odd category called odes and ends , for all the poems which didn't find a home elsewhere.

There is poetry in the collection suitable for all ages of children, from pre-school to primary school age. However, the collection is mostly aimed at junior school children, those aged between 7 and 11 years old. One section of the site, the rude poems , deserves special mention as it's really only suitable for older children. If you're not sure whether you should be reading the them, it would be a good idea to ask your Mum, Dad, teacher or a responsible adult first.

Sheep are my third favourite animal, after hippos and my cat Timmy, who you'll meet in the section called about the author's cat . (You'll have to visit the animal poems to discover my least favourite animals). Sheep are also quite intelligent, so they're not here just to make the site look pretty. As you visit the various sections of the site you'll meet different types of sheep and discover what they signify. Beware if you see a sheep sitting on the lavatory, as it means that the contents of that page may be rude.

As well as the funny verse, there are some other fun bits of the site you'll want to explore. Writing funny poetry gives a few hints on how to start writing your own comic poems and get them noticed by other people. About the author tells you a little bit about me and rather more about Timmy, my adorable little black cat who gets very upset if he isn't the centre of attention.

Emily Dickinson died in Amherst in 1886. After her death her family members found her hand-sewn books, or “fascicles.” These fascicles contained nearly 1,800 poems. Though Mabel Loomis Todd and Higginson published the first selection of her poems in 1890, a complete volume did not appear until 1955. Edited by Thomas H. Johnson, the poems still bore the editorial hand of Todd and Higginson. It was not until R.W. Franklin’s version of Dickinson’s poems appeared in 1998 that her order, unusual punctuation and spelling choices were completely restored.

All experience levels are welcome to a monthly book group moderated by library staff. In 2013, the library will ask individuals from varied backgrounds to select a title that has...

Cynthia Nixon delivers a triumphant performance as Emily Dickinson as she personifies the wit, intellectual independence and pathos of the poet whose genius only came to be recognized after her...


Emily Dickinson’s manuscripts are located in two primary collections: the Amherst College Library and the Houghton Library of Harvard University. The poems that were in Mabel Loomis Todd’s possession are at Amherst; those that remained within the Dickinson households are at the Houghton Library.
 
 

Not sure where to start? Who to listen to? What to read? The links below will help to get you on your way.

TAKE A TOUR
POET IN RESIDENCE
FIND POETS
FIND POEMS
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS
GLOSSARY

The Poetry Archive’s vision is to acquire and make recordings of contemporary English-language poets reading their own work, collect and preserve recordings of great poets from the past, and make extracts from all these recordings available free of charge.

Hi, I'm Patrick Winstanley, a living (as in alive) English poet who believes that poetry should a fun activity enjoyed with family and friends, rather than a form of torture inflicted on children by their teachers. With the help on my fellow poets Paul Curtis, Max Scratchmann and Kate Williams, I've produced an exciting and unusual collection of funny poems for kids. If you're not used to hearing the words 'poetry' and 'exciting' in the same sentence, please don't give up just yet, because these poems really are a little bit different...

If I haven't convinced you yet, perhaps the best thing is to dive straight in and try a few. As the saying goes, the proof of the poem is in the reading...

If you click on the funny poems button in the navigation on the left, you're taken to the poetry index. The poems are divided up into ten different types, which start with the cute and cuddly animal poems and end with some rather naughty poems . In between you'll find poems about families, famous people , school and sports , plus a rather odd category called odes and ends , for all the poems which didn't find a home elsewhere.

There is poetry in the collection suitable for all ages of children, from pre-school to primary school age. However, the collection is mostly aimed at junior school children, those aged between 7 and 11 years old. One section of the site, the rude poems , deserves special mention as it's really only suitable for older children. If you're not sure whether you should be reading the them, it would be a good idea to ask your Mum, Dad, teacher or a responsible adult first.

Sheep are my third favourite animal, after hippos and my cat Timmy, who you'll meet in the section called about the author's cat . (You'll have to visit the animal poems to discover my least favourite animals). Sheep are also quite intelligent, so they're not here just to make the site look pretty. As you visit the various sections of the site you'll meet different types of sheep and discover what they signify. Beware if you see a sheep sitting on the lavatory, as it means that the contents of that page may be rude.

As well as the funny verse, there are some other fun bits of the site you'll want to explore. Writing funny poetry gives a few hints on how to start writing your own comic poems and get them noticed by other people. About the author tells you a little bit about me and rather more about Timmy, my adorable little black cat who gets very upset if he isn't the centre of attention.

Emily Dickinson died in Amherst in 1886. After her death her family members found her hand-sewn books, or “fascicles.” These fascicles contained nearly 1,800 poems. Though Mabel Loomis Todd and Higginson published the first selection of her poems in 1890, a complete volume did not appear until 1955. Edited by Thomas H. Johnson, the poems still bore the editorial hand of Todd and Higginson. It was not until R.W. Franklin’s version of Dickinson’s poems appeared in 1998 that her order, unusual punctuation and spelling choices were completely restored.

All experience levels are welcome to a monthly book group moderated by library staff. In 2013, the library will ask individuals from varied backgrounds to select a title that has...

Cynthia Nixon delivers a triumphant performance as Emily Dickinson as she personifies the wit, intellectual independence and pathos of the poet whose genius only came to be recognized after her...


Emily Dickinson’s manuscripts are located in two primary collections: the Amherst College Library and the Houghton Library of Harvard University. The poems that were in Mabel Loomis Todd’s possession are at Amherst; those that remained within the Dickinson households are at the Houghton Library.
 
 

Not sure where to start? Who to listen to? What to read? The links below will help to get you on your way.

TAKE A TOUR
POET IN RESIDENCE
FIND POETS
FIND POEMS
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS
GLOSSARY

The Poetry Archive’s vision is to acquire and make recordings of contemporary English-language poets reading their own work, collect and preserve recordings of great poets from the past, and make extracts from all these recordings available free of charge.

We are proud to present this exclusive online content by Alexander Rothman to celebrate the release of IR 37.1, Summer 2015 , which features our graphic memoir folio.

I call the work that I make and publish “comics poetry.” I have reasons for using that name and working in the hybrid form, but here’s the thing: I have no idols to tear down, and I hate polemics, so,

It’s really an invitation. There’s work to be done (always), and here’s what some of it could be. This stuff will be stronger if we hold it up next to each other.

Now, then. Here’s what I mean by “comics poetry”: poetry is a form where the medium is language. Other forms have ancillary concerns—for instance, plots for novels, arguments for essays, and performances for plays. Of course poems can take on these concerns, and of course language plays a central role in these other forms. But at the end of the day, more than any other practitioner, a poet is just dealing with words. When she sets out to do work, she must ask herself, “How do I solve this creative problem with language?” or “What else can language do?”

To put it another way, poets spend most of our time rooting around in language’s toolbox. We know that the earliest poems arose from oral traditions. To enhance the telling of histories and epics, performers developed mnemonic rhythms, breath-control strategies, and so on. Successive generations of poets have added countless more strategies for harvesting words’ expressive potential. We draw upon the connotative and denotative sense of words; their sounds, alone or in intricate meters; their enjambment across lines; their spatial arrangement on the page—every last aspect of language is there for the poet to use, break, reinvent.

That’s my working definition of poetry. Do I think it’s the only one or the “correct” one? Of course not. It’s so broad as to be absurd, but I think it serves as a container for the myriad, fractious things that have been called “poetry.” What else binds sestinas, slam, caligrammes, and haiku?

Hi, I'm Patrick Winstanley, a living (as in alive) English poet who believes that poetry should a fun activity enjoyed with family and friends, rather than a form of torture inflicted on children by their teachers. With the help on my fellow poets Paul Curtis, Max Scratchmann and Kate Williams, I've produced an exciting and unusual collection of funny poems for kids. If you're not used to hearing the words 'poetry' and 'exciting' in the same sentence, please don't give up just yet, because these poems really are a little bit different...

If I haven't convinced you yet, perhaps the best thing is to dive straight in and try a few. As the saying goes, the proof of the poem is in the reading...

If you click on the funny poems button in the navigation on the left, you're taken to the poetry index. The poems are divided up into ten different types, which start with the cute and cuddly animal poems and end with some rather naughty poems . In between you'll find poems about families, famous people , school and sports , plus a rather odd category called odes and ends , for all the poems which didn't find a home elsewhere.

There is poetry in the collection suitable for all ages of children, from pre-school to primary school age. However, the collection is mostly aimed at junior school children, those aged between 7 and 11 years old. One section of the site, the rude poems , deserves special mention as it's really only suitable for older children. If you're not sure whether you should be reading the them, it would be a good idea to ask your Mum, Dad, teacher or a responsible adult first.

Sheep are my third favourite animal, after hippos and my cat Timmy, who you'll meet in the section called about the author's cat . (You'll have to visit the animal poems to discover my least favourite animals). Sheep are also quite intelligent, so they're not here just to make the site look pretty. As you visit the various sections of the site you'll meet different types of sheep and discover what they signify. Beware if you see a sheep sitting on the lavatory, as it means that the contents of that page may be rude.

As well as the funny verse, there are some other fun bits of the site you'll want to explore. Writing funny poetry gives a few hints on how to start writing your own comic poems and get them noticed by other people. About the author tells you a little bit about me and rather more about Timmy, my adorable little black cat who gets very upset if he isn't the centre of attention.


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