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Lectures on the history of philosophy - Internet Archive


Lectures on the Philosophy of History , also translated as Lectures on the Philosophy of World History ( LPH ; German : Vorlesungen über die Philosophie der Weltgeschichte ), [1] is a major work by Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770–1831), originally given as lectures at the University of Berlin in 1822, 1828, and 1830. It presents world history in terms of the Hegelian philosophy in order to show that history follows the dictates of reason and that the natural progress of history is due to the outworking of absolute spirit .

The text was originally published in 1837 by the editor Eduard Gans, six years after Hegel's death, utilizing Hegel's own lecture notes as well as those found that were written by his students. A second German edition was compiled by Hegel's son, Karl, in 1840. A third German edition, edited by Georg Lasson, was published in 1917.

Hegel begins by distinguishing three methods or modes of doing history: Original History, Reflective History and Philosophical History.

Original history is like that of Herodotus and Thucydides , these are almost contemporaneous writings limited to deeds, events and states of society which they had before their very eyes and whose culture they shared.

Reflective history is written at some temporal distance from the events or history considered. However, for Hegel, this form of history has a tendency to impose the cultural prejudices and ideas of the historians' era upon the past history over which the historian reflects.

Philosophical history for Hegel, is the true way. Hegel maintains that with philosophical history the historian must bracket his own preconceptions and go and find the overall sense and the driving ideas out of the very matter of the history considered. [1]

Lectures on the History of Philosophy ( LHP ; German : Vorlesungen über die Geschichte der Philosophie , VGPh , delivered 1819, 1820, 1825–6, 1827–8, 1829–30, and 1831 [1] ) is a compilation of notes from university lectures on the history of philosophy given by Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel . In it, he outlined his ideas on the major philosophers. He saw consciousness as progressing from an undifferentiated pantheism of the East to a more individualistic understanding culminating in the freedom of the Germanic era .

In his lectures Hegel cites extensively the voluminous histories of philosophy written in Germany after 1740; among them: Johann Jakob Brucker 's Historia critica philosophiae , 6 vols. (1742–67; "Critical History of Philosophy"); Johann Buhle 's Lehrbuch der Geschichte der Philosophie , 8 vols. (1796–1804; "Textbook on the History of Philosophy"); Dietrich Tiedemann 's Geist der spekulativen Philosophie von Thales bis Berkeley , 6 vols. (1791–97; "The Spirit of Speculative Philosophy from Thales to Berkeley"); and Gottlieb Tennemann 's Geschichte der Philosophie , 11 vols. (1789–1819; "History of Philosophy").

Lectures on the History of Philosophy ( LHP ; German : Vorlesungen über die Geschichte der Philosophie , VGPh , 1825–6 [1] ) is a compilation of notes from university lectures on the history of philosophy given by Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel . In it, he outlined his ideas on the major philosophers. He saw consciousness as progressing from an undifferentiated pantheism of the East to a more individualistic understanding culminating in the freedom of the Germanic era .

In his lectures Hegel cites extensively the voluminous histories of philosophy written in Germany after 1740; among them: Johann Jakob Brucker 's Historia critica philosophiae , 6 vols. (1742–67; "Critical History of Philosophy"); Johann Buhle 's Lehrbuch der Geschichte der Philosophie , 8 vols. (1796–1804; "Textbook on the History of Philosophy"); Dietrich Tiedemann 's Geist der spekulativen Philosophie von Thales bis Berkeley , 6 vols. (1791–97; "The Spirit of Speculative Philosophy from Thales to Berkeley"); and Gottlieb Tennemann 's Geschichte der Philosophie , 11 vols. (1789–1819; "History of Philosophy").

Lectures on the Philosophy of History , also translated as Lectures on the Philosophy of World History ( LPH ; German : Vorlesungen über die Philosophie der Weltgeschichte ), [1] is a major work by Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770–1831), originally given as lectures at the University of Berlin in 1822, 1828, and 1830. It presents world history in terms of the Hegelian philosophy in order to show that history follows the dictates of reason and that the natural progress of history is due to the outworking of absolute spirit .

The text was originally published in 1837 by the editor Eduard Gans, six years after Hegel's death, utilizing Hegel's own lecture notes as well as those found that were written by his students. A second German edition was compiled by Hegel's son, Karl, in 1840. A third German edition, edited by Georg Lasson, was published in 1917.

Hegel begins by distinguishing three methods or modes of doing history: Original History, Reflective History and Philosophical History.

Original history is like that of Herodotus and Thucydides , these are almost contemporaneous writings limited to deeds, events and states of society which they had before their very eyes and whose culture they shared.

Reflective history is written at some temporal distance from the events or history considered. However, for Hegel, this form of history has a tendency to impose the cultural prejudices and ideas of the historians' era upon the past history over which the historian reflects.

Philosophical history for Hegel, is the true way. Hegel maintains that with philosophical history the historian must bracket his own preconceptions and go and find the overall sense and the driving ideas out of the very matter of the history considered. [1]

Lectures on the Philosophy of History , also translated as Lectures on the Philosophy of World History ( LPH ; German : Vorlesungen über die Philosophie der Weltgeschichte ), [1] is a major work by Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770–1831), originally given as lectures at the University of Berlin in 1822, 1828, and 1830. It presents world history in terms of the Hegelian philosophy in order to show that history follows the dictates of reason and that the natural progress of history is due to the outworking of absolute spirit .

The text was originally published in 1837 by the editor Eduard Gans, six years after Hegel's death, utilizing Hegel's own lecture notes as well as those found that were written by his students. A second German edition was compiled by Hegel's son, Karl, in 1840. A third German edition, edited by Georg Lasson, was published in 1917.

Hegel begins by distinguishing three methods or modes of doing history: Original History, Reflective History and Philosophical History.

Original history is like that of Herodotus and Thucydides , these are almost contemporaneous writings limited to deeds, events and states of society which they had before their very eyes and whose culture they shared.

Reflective history is written at some temporal distance from the events or history considered. However, for Hegel, this form of history has a tendency to impose the cultural prejudices and ideas of the historians' era upon the past history over which the historian reflects.

Philosophical history for Hegel, is the true way. Hegel maintains that with philosophical history the historian must bracket his own preconceptions and go and find the overall sense and the driving ideas out of the very matter of the history considered. [1]

Lectures on the History of Philosophy ( LHP ; German : Vorlesungen über die Geschichte der Philosophie , VGPh , delivered 1819, 1820, 1825–6, 1827–8, 1829–30, and 1831 [1] ) is a compilation of notes from university lectures on the history of philosophy given by Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel . In it, he outlined his ideas on the major philosophers. He saw consciousness as progressing from an undifferentiated pantheism of the East to a more individualistic understanding culminating in the freedom of the Germanic era .

In his lectures Hegel cites extensively the voluminous histories of philosophy written in Germany after 1740; among them: Johann Jakob Brucker 's Historia critica philosophiae , 6 vols. (1742–67; "Critical History of Philosophy"); Johann Buhle 's Lehrbuch der Geschichte der Philosophie , 8 vols. (1796–1804; "Textbook on the History of Philosophy"); Dietrich Tiedemann 's Geist der spekulativen Philosophie von Thales bis Berkeley , 6 vols. (1791–97; "The Spirit of Speculative Philosophy from Thales to Berkeley"); and Gottlieb Tennemann 's Geschichte der Philosophie , 11 vols. (1789–1819; "History of Philosophy").


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