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Romans 8 ESV - Life in the Spirit - There is therefore.


God is Spirit
God, in whom we live and move and have our being, is Spirit. We do not, and cannot, exist apart from God; for we are the created effects of the uncreated Cause that is effecting our existence. Our cognitive-affective consciousness is the created effect of the uncreated cognitive-affective Consciousness (Spirit) that is effecting it. This is the meaning of the concept “concursus” in traditional Catholic theology; all creation is, here and now, being effected by the uncreated Cause effecting it.

Prayer, in this context, is our conscious reciprocity with the originating Spirit, the uncreated Consciousness, of our created consciousness. We can pray because our consciousness is a created participation in the uncreated consciousness of God. We do not see the Spirit with whom we communicate in prayer, any more than we see ourselves in the immediacy and intimacy of our cognitive and affective consciousness; for our communion with the Spirit in the reciprocity of prayer is a created and intimate participation in the Ultimate Reality that is effecting our conscious spiritual life.

Spirit alone is the source of spirit. Our human spirit does not derive from matter because matter cannot give what it does not, of itself, possess: spirit. The ovum and sperm of our parents are not the source of our human spirit, of our cognitive-affective consciousness.

The gift of the Holy Spirit is the active presence in us of the glory of the Lord, who transforms us into his image, and to be in Jesus Christ is to live in the Spirit. Life in the Spirit is the experience, therefore, of an activating presence made manifest in our conduct and conditions. Its keynote is newness of life, the conversion notably absent from secular philosophies. The law yields to the blessing of Abraham in the spirit of the promise, the law of the flesh to the law of the spirit and justice, the works of the flesh to the fruits of the Spirit, the divine anger to the reign of joy and peace. Little children become spiritual adults.

Life in the Spirit is an organic principle, showing us how to imitate Christ, and giving us the power to do so, for the Spirit is the origin of Christian conduct, and the absolute author of its holiness (Gal 5:13-26). But how is this life in the Spirit to be attained and manifested? It is neither a question, nor pious practices, nor simply of a moral code; the former may be unrelated to interior dispositions and the needs of current history, while the latter could be constructed from motives unconnected with the supernatural.

When the time had fully come, God sent forth his Son, born of woman, born under the law, to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive the adoption of sons. And because you are sons, God has sent the spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying Abba! Father! So, through God you are no longer a slave but a son, and if a son then an heir (Gal 4:4-7).

How important is life in the Spirit? Dr. Robert Mounce said, “How to live in and by the Spirit is the single most important lesson a believer can ever learn.” Think about that—and about all the things you need to know as a Christian. It struck me for a moment. It certainly puts the Holy Spirit in a new light.

By way of background, let me mention that there are many different ways of living the Christian life. There are seminars and there are books and there are study guides galore—each offering a different perspective. There are so many different ideas floating around out there. Let me mention at least three faulty ways of trying to live the Christian life.

The first faulty way is trying to live the Christian life by a set of rules. “Do this, don’t do that.” “Do this, this and this, but don’t do this or this or this.” There are many people whose view of the Christian life is just a list of do’s and don’ts. For some, it is simply the Old Testament law warmed over and brought into the Christian church. The problem of living by rules is that it can lead to legalism. Legalism is any attempt to please God on the basis of what you do in the flesh.

Second, you can live the Christian life by a formula. We’ve all heard the formulas: Three steps to answered prayer, four keys to Christian victory, five ways you can walk in the Spirit. Three ways, four ways, five ways, the bookstores are just filled with formulaic admonitions for living the Christian life. The problem with formulaic Christian life is that it can produce mechanical Christianity.

Rules and formulas and experience have their place. But taken alone, they lead to a sub-standard Christian life. Why? Because they tend to lead you away from the one thing that is most important. God has given us something better than rules, better than a formula, better than experience. God has given us the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit is the secret of living the Christian life. If you want to know where the Christian life is found, if you want to know how to live in victory, then you must learn how to live in, by and through the Holy Spirit of God. That is the secret.

The New Testament tells us that the Holy Spirit is always here. Our job is to stay in contact with the Spirit. When we stay in contact with the Holy Spirit, he continuously provides the power we need for effective Christian living.

God is Spirit
God, in whom we live and move and have our being, is Spirit. We do not, and cannot, exist apart from God; for we are the created effects of the uncreated Cause that is effecting our existence. Our cognitive-affective consciousness is the created effect of the uncreated cognitive-affective Consciousness (Spirit) that is effecting it. This is the meaning of the concept “concursus” in traditional Catholic theology; all creation is, here and now, being effected by the uncreated Cause effecting it.

Prayer, in this context, is our conscious reciprocity with the originating Spirit, the uncreated Consciousness, of our created consciousness. We can pray because our consciousness is a created participation in the uncreated consciousness of God. We do not see the Spirit with whom we communicate in prayer, any more than we see ourselves in the immediacy and intimacy of our cognitive and affective consciousness; for our communion with the Spirit in the reciprocity of prayer is a created and intimate participation in the Ultimate Reality that is effecting our conscious spiritual life.

Spirit alone is the source of spirit. Our human spirit does not derive from matter because matter cannot give what it does not, of itself, possess: spirit. The ovum and sperm of our parents are not the source of our human spirit, of our cognitive-affective consciousness.

The gift of the Holy Spirit is the active presence in us of the glory of the Lord, who transforms us into his image, and to be in Jesus Christ is to live in the Spirit. Life in the Spirit is the experience, therefore, of an activating presence made manifest in our conduct and conditions. Its keynote is newness of life, the conversion notably absent from secular philosophies. The law yields to the blessing of Abraham in the spirit of the promise, the law of the flesh to the law of the spirit and justice, the works of the flesh to the fruits of the Spirit, the divine anger to the reign of joy and peace. Little children become spiritual adults.

Life in the Spirit is an organic principle, showing us how to imitate Christ, and giving us the power to do so, for the Spirit is the origin of Christian conduct, and the absolute author of its holiness (Gal 5:13-26). But how is this life in the Spirit to be attained and manifested? It is neither a question, nor pious practices, nor simply of a moral code; the former may be unrelated to interior dispositions and the needs of current history, while the latter could be constructed from motives unconnected with the supernatural.

When the time had fully come, God sent forth his Son, born of woman, born under the law, to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive the adoption of sons. And because you are sons, God has sent the spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying Abba! Father! So, through God you are no longer a slave but a son, and if a son then an heir (Gal 4:4-7).

God is Spirit
God, in whom we live and move and have our being, is Spirit. We do not, and cannot, exist apart from God; for we are the created effects of the uncreated Cause that is effecting our existence. Our cognitive-affective consciousness is the created effect of the uncreated cognitive-affective Consciousness (Spirit) that is effecting it. This is the meaning of the concept “concursus” in traditional Catholic theology; all creation is, here and now, being effected by the uncreated Cause effecting it.

Prayer, in this context, is our conscious reciprocity with the originating Spirit, the uncreated Consciousness, of our created consciousness. We can pray because our consciousness is a created participation in the uncreated consciousness of God. We do not see the Spirit with whom we communicate in prayer, any more than we see ourselves in the immediacy and intimacy of our cognitive and affective consciousness; for our communion with the Spirit in the reciprocity of prayer is a created and intimate participation in the Ultimate Reality that is effecting our conscious spiritual life.

Spirit alone is the source of spirit. Our human spirit does not derive from matter because matter cannot give what it does not, of itself, possess: spirit. The ovum and sperm of our parents are not the source of our human spirit, of our cognitive-affective consciousness.

The gift of the Holy Spirit is the active presence in us of the glory of the Lord, who transforms us into his image, and to be in Jesus Christ is to live in the Spirit. Life in the Spirit is the experience, therefore, of an activating presence made manifest in our conduct and conditions. Its keynote is newness of life, the conversion notably absent from secular philosophies. The law yields to the blessing of Abraham in the spirit of the promise, the law of the flesh to the law of the spirit and justice, the works of the flesh to the fruits of the Spirit, the divine anger to the reign of joy and peace. Little children become spiritual adults.

Life in the Spirit is an organic principle, showing us how to imitate Christ, and giving us the power to do so, for the Spirit is the origin of Christian conduct, and the absolute author of its holiness (Gal 5:13-26). But how is this life in the Spirit to be attained and manifested? It is neither a question, nor pious practices, nor simply of a moral code; the former may be unrelated to interior dispositions and the needs of current history, while the latter could be constructed from motives unconnected with the supernatural.

When the time had fully come, God sent forth his Son, born of woman, born under the law, to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive the adoption of sons. And because you are sons, God has sent the spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying Abba! Father! So, through God you are no longer a slave but a son, and if a son then an heir (Gal 4:4-7).

How important is life in the Spirit? Dr. Robert Mounce said, “How to live in and by the Spirit is the single most important lesson a believer can ever learn.” Think about that—and about all the things you need to know as a Christian. It struck me for a moment. It certainly puts the Holy Spirit in a new light.

By way of background, let me mention that there are many different ways of living the Christian life. There are seminars and there are books and there are study guides galore—each offering a different perspective. There are so many different ideas floating around out there. Let me mention at least three faulty ways of trying to live the Christian life.

The first faulty way is trying to live the Christian life by a set of rules. “Do this, don’t do that.” “Do this, this and this, but don’t do this or this or this.” There are many people whose view of the Christian life is just a list of do’s and don’ts. For some, it is simply the Old Testament law warmed over and brought into the Christian church. The problem of living by rules is that it can lead to legalism. Legalism is any attempt to please God on the basis of what you do in the flesh.

Second, you can live the Christian life by a formula. We’ve all heard the formulas: Three steps to answered prayer, four keys to Christian victory, five ways you can walk in the Spirit. Three ways, four ways, five ways, the bookstores are just filled with formulaic admonitions for living the Christian life. The problem with formulaic Christian life is that it can produce mechanical Christianity.

Rules and formulas and experience have their place. But taken alone, they lead to a sub-standard Christian life. Why? Because they tend to lead you away from the one thing that is most important. God has given us something better than rules, better than a formula, better than experience. God has given us the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit is the secret of living the Christian life. If you want to know where the Christian life is found, if you want to know how to live in victory, then you must learn how to live in, by and through the Holy Spirit of God. That is the secret.

The New Testament tells us that the Holy Spirit is always here. Our job is to stay in contact with the Spirit. When we stay in contact with the Holy Spirit, he continuously provides the power we need for effective Christian living.

The first talk is about God’s love for us. It’s about hope and the promise of what he is offering:-that ongoing personal relationship between a loving father and his children.

A Parish priest from Crystal Glen in Cardiff. Father Matthew was parish priest in Ledbury (1982-1986). A modern language scholar at Cambridge, he studied for the priesthood in Rome and later studied canon law in Canada.

This talk is about who Jesus is and what he does. In other words the basic gospel message. “ For God so loved the world that He gave His only son so that everyone who believes in Him may not die but have eternal life. ” (John 3:16). God sent His Son Jesus to give us new life and to reveal the Father’s love. Through His life, death and resurrection, Jesus is Shepherd, Healer, Lord and saviour.

Fr. Emmanuel is a Franciscan Friar of the Renewal. They are easily recognised by their grey habits which give them their other name -The Greyfriars. He lives in the East End of London where the Friars serve the poor and homeless. He studied and was ordained in New York where the Greyfriars have their original house.

The third seminar is about the fact that The Gospel-The Good News- really is good news and that a new life is available through a fuller reception of the Holy Spirit. This new life centres on an experiential relationship with Jesus. “ I have come so that they may have life and have it in abundance. ” (John 10:10)

Jenny is married, with twin daughters, and lives in Hertfordshire. She is the co-ordinator for the Celebrate Conferences around the country and has helped develop and present the CAFE resources. She is a gifted and popular speaker at conferences and seminars.

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